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God Eater 2

Japanator Live photo
Japanator Live

Japanator LIVE: Take a few bites with God Eater 2


Give it a taste
Sep 21
// Red Veron
[Stream will begin at 10PM US Central Time over at the Japanator YouTube page] Hello, lovely viewers! It's been a while since I've done a stream and now I've got a game that recently came out that I also reviewed here on Jap...

Review: God Eater 2: Rage Burst

Sep 14 // Red Veron
GOD EATER 2: Rage Burst (PlayStation 4 [Reviewed], PlayStation Vita, PC)Developer: ShiftPublisher: Banday Namco EntertainmentReleased: August 30, 2016 (NA/EU), February 19, 2015MSRP: $59.99 (PS4), $49.99 (PC), $39.99 (Vita) God Eater 2: Rage Burst is the expanded version of the sequel to God Eater, much like how the original God Eater on PSP made it outside Japan. This is a new expanded version of the God Eater 2, a sequel that the west never got that will please those who've waited years since the first God Eater in 2010, especially for those who enjoyed all the new stuff in the recent remake, God Eater Resurrection. The God Eater games are the only games that can even come close to Monster Hunter, while it is of that Hunting genre, it is much more accessible than the Monster Hunter. It's much more fast-paced all  around and lacks the animation nuances that are in most of the Monster Hunter games. The God Eater games do a good job in teaching the basics and ease players into the flow of a Hunting game, without having to spend hours learning everything as it integrates it all of into the game with a story to spice up the gameplay. A lot of the new features we saw in the enhanced remake God Eater Resurrection were from God Eater 2: Rage Burst, but that was just a small taste of all the new features that improved the formula. One thing that returning gamers might notice is there is a bit of reused content from the previous game, God Eater Resurrection. While reusing levels and assets are quite common in games in the Hunting genre, there are a bit of changes to the content that give them a different feel, though it may only be noticed by those paying close attention. This is also due to the fact that Resurrection came out after Rage Burst, so being made around the same time can result in recycling but the two games are different enough from each other in terms of mechanics and in the new content. One of the new additions to the God Eater formula are the Blood Arts, which add some oomph to each type of attack and varies by weapon, such as powering up your attacks and you can choose whichever suits the situation and/or your style. Another welcome addition is being able to add skills to weapons and shield that give bonus stats to the player which is available pretty early in the game. These are only a few of the new additions that add so much more ways to plays and more customization for weapons over the previous game. While there are a lot of ways to customize, you only have to fiddle with your gear for only a little bit and it is mostly optional. As I've mentioned in my review for God Eater Resurrection, those wanting to dive into the franchise and play the best version should just play God Eater 2: Rage Burst. This sequel is also much more friendlier to those new to the genre and is solo friendly for those not wanting to touch the online multiplayer mode. One way that it makes it easier to get into and/or play solo is to take advantage of all the new customization features to make your character stronger so you can hold your own enough to learn the basics. Though there are all these options that make the introduction to this game and genre much easier, they aren't communicated to the player in the clearest fashion. It requires a bit of digging into all the menus to actually get those 'help' explanations. It can get confusing for those unfamiliar, but with some patience, one can learn enough of the mechanics to blaze through the game. Returning players might breeze through much of the story mode and veterans might find it a bit easy, but there are a set of harder missions that are available to play early in the game for those looking for a challenge and want to try out all the new game elements. The game does ramp up later and gives a proper challenge with new enemies and harder scenarios. [embed]35233:5839:0[/embed] Rage Burst places the player as the newest recruit in the Blood Special Forces unit, a special group of God Eaters who are an elite unit that are the only ones who can fight the new species of Aragami. We get introduced to a new cast of characters and we also get to see characters and places from the previous game. You can also get to know these new characters in 'Character Episodes', which are side stories that let you get to know more of these new characters and along with some extra missions. There's a story told through many cutscenes, while the story isn't dense, it sure takes its sweet time to unfold and can be a plus for those wanting something to break up the monotony of the hunting game grind. The rate of which of the story unfolds can be a drawback for those who don't want to invest dozens of hours into the game. The parts of the story feel like episodes in an anime series, that are broken up into pieces but kind of build on each other. But the game is playable in short sessions where most missions can knocked out in under 5 to 10 minutes, so those with an hour to spare can get a good chunk of some hack-and-slash action. Those purchasing Rage Burst on Steam and PS4 near launch will also get God Eater Resurrection (along with some costumes from Sword Art Online, Tokyo Ghoul, and Tales of Zestiria), making it a good value, though playing Resurrection is not needed to enjoy Rage Burst but it helps in world building. These costumes only provide cosmetic changes, and hopefully we get more in the future (PLEASE BRING OVER THE GINTAMA COSTUMES). God Eater 2: Rage Burst is the best way to get into the hunting genre right now for many reasons; it's easy enough to pick up, it has a lot to offer, and it has online multiplayer for those wanting to play with people. This game is good for those wanting to dip their toe into hunting games for the first time. Those returning to God Eater will find enjoyment in the new variety of features in this new installment, but some veterans may feel that it's not enough new stuff especially after recently playing the enhanced remake of the first game. But there's still enough to get out of this new game, Rage Burst shines more with what's under the surface, those willing to dig in deeper will find a lot of good things and a good time.
God Eater 2: Rage Burst photo
New Look, Same Great Taste
Monster Hunter is one of the behemoths of gaming in Japan, it still sells like crazy every time and has made its own genre (Yes, I know about Phantasy Star Online). Many have tried to hunt down the same success but only one f...

Review: God Eater Resurrection

Jul 28 // Red Veron
God Eater Resurrection (Playstation 4 [Tested], PlayStation Vita [Reviewed], PlayStation TV [Reviewed], PC)Developer: ShiftPublisher: Bandai Namco EntertainmentRelease Date: October 15, 2015 (JP), June 28, 2016 (NA), August 30, 2016 (EU, PC)MSRP: $19.99 The God Eater games have always been visually unique, unlike the many medieval fantasy-like set Hunting games, God Eater differentiates itself with a post-apocalyptic, dystopian science fiction setting coupled with fashionable anime character designs that look straight off the streets of Tokyo. First released for the PlayStation Portable in 2010 in the USA under the renamed title Gods Eater Burst (to not offend those who believe in only one god), the game never had a chance to show its stuff due to the PlayStation Portable being deemed commercially dead in the US at the time. Now in 2016, God Eater gets another chance in the west with God Eater Resurrection. Don't think that this is just a simple remaster, this enhanced remake serves up a second helping that brings more than a visual upgrade and retroactively receives new content from the sequel and the recent anime adaptation. The new added content comes in the form of weapons, moves, voice acting, story elements, and new enemies as well as changes to the old enemies. God Eater is set decades in the future where creatures called Aragami have climbed to the top of the food chain and what's left of humanity fights to survive everyday. The eponymous "God Eaters" are the wielders of  special weapons are called "God Arcs", giant blade weapons that are the only ones that can slay the Aragami, and can grow a giant pair of sharp jaws that can take a bite out of the Aragami to extract temporary buffs and materials from the enemy. The "-gami" in Aragami means god (which in this case they are powerful beings), hence the title "God Eater". God Eater Resurrection is a hunting game in the vein of Monster Hunter, but with with its own take on the formula and is much more accessible than most of the older Monster Hunter games that came out before it in 2010. The combat of God Eater leans toward more of an hack-and-slash action game than the more methodical timing in the combat of Monster Hunter. God Eater's God Arc alternates between a melee and ranged weapon, both of which have different types each that allow for different combination of play styles.  The first few missions are short and ease you in to the hunting mechanics while you shoot and wail away at the enemies, it does a quick job in getting you going compared to most other Hunting games. God Eater is still true to the genre and has you going on missions to gather materials (though not to same degree as Monster Hunter) from enemies and the environment to improve your gear and learning the different ways to effectively fight the enemies. Among the unique ways to fight enemies effectively is a bullet customization system (revised in this new version) for the bullets fired from the God Arc which allows for unique ways to fight with the different combinations of elemental and projectile types. This new version also adds in new weaponry from the sequel, God Eater 2: Rage Burst, that gives players a new way to play such as the Valiant Scythe and the Boost Hammer. New additions include "Predator" moves that allow you to bite enemies in different ways to activate ability boosts. Do not let the accessibility of the game fool you, there is a lot of depth with the combat and even more with this new version. Utilizing everything at your disposal, from equipment to tactics, to give you an advantage in defeating your enemies is still paramount in getting far into this game, especially for near endgame content and beyond. God Eater Resurrection still plays very much like the original but with the added benefit of the right stick for improved camera controls and adds a host of control options. It also takes advantage of the new platform with options to use the touch controls on the Vita, which makes me favor the handheld version over the prettier console version. The corners of the Vita's touchscreen, as well as the R3 and L3 buttons on the controller enabled versions of the game, can be assigned to function as extra buttons that either let you quickly access items, team commands, or the map menu. Playing the Vita version on the PlayStation TV microconsole provides a very close core experience to the PlayStation 4 version just without the extra graphical muscle and PlayStation 4 console functionality. The Vita version does have that lack of anti-aliasing but is easily overlooked since still looks good with its nice anime art style and keeps up even in the graphically intense fights in the game. God Eater Resurrection allows cross-save and cross-play between the PlayStation 4 and PlayStation Vita it will be easier to find people to play with, which is important and is a fun time for a hunting game. God Eater Resurrection is rather affordable at $19.99 and not bad for those wanting to check out a solid hunting game experience for not a lot of money, but do check out those special offers where you can get God Eater Resurrection for free when you preorder God Eater 2: Rage Burst on the PlayStation. These offers vary by territory and is a nice way to check out the original as well as get yourself a newer hunting game. All the new added content, better controls and visuals serve to improve the experience quite a lot from the original release. However, the game still feels too similar to the original game, it feels like an older game in the genre, along with the limitations of the original platform. Shift, the developer of this God Eater Resurrection whose prior work the year before, the impressive Freedom Wars, improves on the hunting genre in many ways but not much of those improvements made it back into God Eater Resurrection. Those wanting more of a modern experience may just want to check out the second game, which releases a little after the North American release of God Eater Resurrection. If you are a God Eater veteran and have time for a refresher before the sequel God Eater 2: Rage Burst hits, it is definitely worth it to check it out. If don't have the time to commit, you can skip this one and probably check out some summaries of the new story content out there on the internet to get you ready for the sequel and there's even that anime adaptation to supplement the experience. God Eater Resurrection is a good introduction to the franchise and the genre, overall a good game with the new bells and whistles but is showing its age in a world where newer hunting games exist. [embed]35158:5751:0[/embed]
God Eater Resurrection photo
Back for Seconds
The Monster Hunter franchise's meteoric rise in Japan in the past decade has given birth to a new genre that is still going strong in Japan with numerous contenders that spring up every so often. While many Japanese game...

God Eater 2 Rage Burst photo
God Eater 2 Rage Burst

Satisfy your hunger with God Eater 2 Rage Burst's tasty bundles


Tastes like sweet heaven
Apr 24
// Salvador G Rodiles
With two God Eater titles heading West within the same timeframe, the gang at Bandai Namco have prepared a banquet that'll please those who want to feast on roasted Aragami. For the folks in North America, anyone who gets th...

Review: Project X Zone 2

Apr 19 // Anthony Redgrave
Project X Zone 2 (3DS [Revieweed])Developer: Monolith SoftPublisher: Bandai Namco EntertainmentReleased: November 12, 2015 (JP), December 10, 2015 (KOR), February 16, 2016 (NA), February 12, 2016 (EU, AUS)MSRP: $39.99 Project X Zone 2 is a strategy role-playing game featuring characters from SEGA, Namco Bandai, and Capcom. It will be one of the most bizarre crossovers for players that are not familiar with a lot of Japanese franchises as the game goes deep into each company's library bringing out characters from Sakura Wars, God Eater, and yes, even the Sega Saturn Mascot Segata Sanshiro. The large variety of characters can be intimidating but the game doesn't go too in-depth narratively into any one franchise going for generalised statements around the lore of each one. The game contains an encyclopaedia or "Crosspedia" for players wanting to learn more about each character, terminology, and aspects of the game. It's an all-inclusive document that works well for explaining the background behind each character but not so much for teaching players the advanced aspects of gameplay.  This title is a sequel to Project X Zone and continues the story of two warring factions Shinra and Ouma. They're original teams containing original characters for this cross-over series that recruit heroes and villains from games to fight for their cause. As the story progresses you will collect a bevy of different heroes, anti-heroes, and even antagonists to fight for Shinra as they try to stop Ouma and their plans. The story is pretty thin and serves as a means of delivering all the characters to different franchise locals like Kamurocho, Mallet Island, and Sword Valley. It is thrilling to see where the game will take you next and which character will be recruited into the party. As a newcomer to the Project X Zone games, I did not feel I was missing much from not playing the prequel. A lot of the story is self-contained bar some lines of dialogue making light reference to previous iteration or characters mentioning that they have met before. Plot progression can be meandering at times especially during the middle-end of the game as once you've seen all the characters the circumstances you end up in makes you feel you're taking one step forward followed by two steps back.  On the gameplay side, Project X Zone 2 is fairly shallow on both the strategy and role-playing sides of the SRPG. The game is too easy for strategy and positioning to have any impact on battles and choosing upgrades feels less of a customizable choice but rather a necessity so you aren't underpowered for the next stage. I never felt my choice in upgrades affected my gameplay or strategy when going into battle. In the later game when your party size balloons, micromanaging equipment, and upgrading attacks become tedious and would have benefitted from an auto-assign function. The positioning of units only mattered when it came to the combat portions as they adjacent units can be called for assists or support. Therefore, bunching units together as much as possible was the strategy I utilised throughout the game with little consequence. Almost all the stages require the player to eliminate all targets so more variety would have been welcomed to incorporate more strategy in the game.  The actual combat is an area where the game really shines. Having to choose attacks carefully and choosing the right time to attack confirming critical hits helps keep the fights engaging each time you do them. I really enjoyed the displays of signature moves that can be combined with support attacks and assists to become a large ball of chaotic numbers flying around with a cinematic finish. The developer had fun to include as many nods and authentic moves from each series' to help sell the game as a large collaboration of different franchises.  I think my favourite thing about Project X Zone 2 is the way it treats each franchise. The title gives each one respect and an opportunity in the limelight. Having the music change to the respectful game track of the character being controlled tickles my nostalgia nerve and is a very nice touch. It works especially well when the music cue kicks in before the character is introduced giving hints of the next party member. As a game light on story, it is also light-hearted with the scenarios it puts the party in. One moment you are walking down the catwalk Space Channel 5 style then frolicking amongst sakura petals recreating a Sega Saturn commercial. If you find this baffling, the game does too with characters acting appropriately to the situation. It's goofy, funny, and really endearing to the each franchise. It's the characters portrayals that I really like within this title and the ways they interact with each other. Sleaze ball characters like Majima and Vashyron will get rebuffed by females, Chun Li's maternal relationship with her partner Xiaoyu, and Ryu's obsession with training. Sadly the same cannot be said for all original characters as Reiji is a boring straight man present to move the plot forward. The art for Project X Zone 2 does a good job in normalising all the characters from the different series into one style. Some realistic characters like Natsu, KOS-MOS, and Segeta Sanshiro look great in their stylised cartoony form while Kazuma Kiryu didn't fair so well in transition. The sprite work and animation are phenomenal keeping everything smooth during fights and looking amazing as each move is executed. Due to the gameplay, everything meshes together into a flurry of attacks and numbers but heading into training mode and trying each move individually you can see the sum of their parts and it is excellent.  Overall I enjoyed my time with Project X Zone 2. The action portion of the combat felt like a good mix of action and strategy, I had a lot of fun with the character interactions, dialogue, and premise of the game. The game works best in short bursts as each stage is 30-40 minutes long bracketed by dialogue scenes that allow players to quickly catch up with the skirmish before engaging in battle once more. The title does have issues with narrative pacing, strategic and gameplay difficulty so while not posing a challenge for strategy fans, it will allow more action centric players to complete the game without frustration. It's a great game to have in your collection if you want to experience a fun wacky side quest with many special guests along for the ride. [This review is based on a digital retail copy of the game provided by the publisher.] Kizumonogatari: Wound TalePublished by: Vertical Inc.Written by: NisiOisiNIllustrated by: VOfanTranslated by: Ko RansomReleased: December 15, 2015MSRP: $14.95
Project X Zone 2 photo
Hey, I think I know that guy!
As an idea Project X Zone 2 is wonderful. It takes players through different worlds celebrating the creativity and unique aspects of each game. Having our favourite characters mingling together as they form a vanguard against...

First Impressions: God Eater episodes 1-3

Jul 30 // Josh Tolentino
The good news is, that visually, God Eater is one of the best-looking shows I've seen in years. And it's not just getting by on style, either. Ufotable, as is their way, has created a technical tour de force with their newest series, using multi-layered shading and coloring techniques to create a unique look for God Eater, as well as finally make an anime where CG creations - in this case, the Aragami monsters and large parts of the backgrounds - don't stick out like a sore thumb.  That doesn't sound huge on its own, but considering the way CG is employed in most traditional 2D anime, it's significant. The few shows to do it well were often all-CG (like Fireball Charming or, err...Sega Hard Girls) or kept the 2D and 3D portions carefully separated (like Ghost in the Shell: Standalone Complex and Etotama). Even Ufotable itself never quite managed the blend with last season's Unlimited Blade Works adaptation. They kept mostly to digital effects, and the CG still looked awkward and out-of-place when used for things like Caster's skeleton warriors or that red water pouring out of the Holy Grail. In most 2D shows, you can usually tell when something's been modeled someone CG comes in just by looking. Whether it's slightly flat colors or an unusual slowness (or smoothness) to the movement, being able to spot the CG in an anime is the "Conspicuously Light Patch" of its age.  To be perfectly honest, that's still technically true in God Eater. It's easy to tell that the Aragami are mostly done in CG, and it's more evident when both monsters and people are on the screen together. Still, the blend on display is better than ever, to the point that after watching the stream on Daisuki, I deliberately sought out a higher-resolution version of the broadcast to see for myself. God Eater just looks that good. More's the pity, then, that the narrative portions of the show simply don't live up to the lavish visuals. In fact, many of the fears some Ufotable fans had about the studio's ability to take on a "heavy" narrative show after five years adapting Type-MOON's "Nasu-verse" for the screen have proven at least partly true so far. Without the dense (and more importantly pre-existing) fiction of the Fate franchise to back it up, God Eater comes across as an Attack on Titan clone where righteous anger has been replaced by a dreary, somewhat undeserved sense of self-importance. It's not all Ufotable's fault, of course. God Eater compared favorably to Monster Hunter in the story department mainly by virtue of actually having a story. As a TV series, God Eater faces much stronger competition, not least of all Ufotable's own stellar work expanding Unlimited Blade Works, just weeks ago. I'd have hoped that they'd be able to make God Eater's world seem less threadbare than in the game, but instead the early results actually seem more stilted than before. In a bitter irony, the game versions of the characters actually seem livelier than in the anime, despite the anime having more "cutscene" in the first three episodes than in the entirety of the game itself. The setup is simple: Ravenous monsters called "Aragami" have destroyed most of humanity, which now hides behind large walled cities under the administration of FENRIR, which employs "God Eaters", warriors that gain superhuman ability when infused with Oracle Cells (the same ones as in the Aragami). God Eaters wield massive weapons called God Arcs to defend mankind's last sanctuaries against the monstrous hordes.  Lenka Utsugi is a newly recruited God Eater in FENRIR's Far East branch. Quite, stoic, and obsessed with taking vengeance upon the Aragami for eating his loved ones, Lenka's a "New-type", who can wield a new, transforming variant of God Arc. His can turn from a massive sword into a massive gun. Being talented, though, makes no substitute for experience, and Lenka's impulsiveness quickly gets him into trouble, forcing the veterans of the 1st Squad, including laid-back badass Lindow Amamiya and his pals Soma and Sakuya to bail him out. Naturally, the kid's got that "something" about him, and by episode 3, Lenka and the squad are working together, and meeting Alisa, another Russian New-type who's got a great hat and, judging by the underboob, might have had the rest of her outfit chosen by her creepy scientist mentor/father-figure. I'm not the kind of guy to go drawing parallels to Attack on Titan When everyone an anime features gross monsters and the people who fight them in a bleakly-toned story, but in this case the parallels are warranted, and unfortunately leave God Eater wanting. The raw anger and passion that underpinned the mood of Eren Jager's saga is here replaced with a dull kind of stoicism. Lenka's strong-but-silent demeanor may be an improvement from the goofball harem tediousness of the God Eater manga's lead, but not by much, and certainly not enough to make Lenka a better lead overall. Worse, points of characterization and flavor that helped the game set a mood in spite of a barebones plot are excised or missing in action here. Story points that might have made God Eater feel less, for lack of a better word, generic, like the privileged status of the God Eater corps or other dynamics, are nowhere to be found, leaving a by-the-numbers "soldiers at the end of the world" moodiness in its place. To be fair, it's still early going, and the show is already forging some newer territory by using flashbacks to the apparent origin of the Aragami and its involvement with FENRIR's higher-ups. It's a sign that Ufotable is beginning to plumb deeper into the lore, which has historically been a strength of theirs as opposed to natural-feeling characterization. Events are moving at a good clip, too, skipping over some of the game's high school shenanigans (at the time used to lazily deploy exposition without spending on animation), so it might not be long before all of it takes a more intriguing turn. Still, there's no avoiding the sense here that some opportunities to make God Eater a more vibrant setting have been missed, and I've no doubt that at least some viewers not hooked on the visuals were turned away by this early narrative blandness. Heck, I'd probably drop the show if I weren't already interested in seeing my favorite MonHun clone get some love.
God Eater photo
No Free Lunch
I've said time and again that God Eater is one of the best - if not the best - attempt yet by competing publishers to take a sip out of Capcom's giant Monster Hunter milkshake. With God Eater, developer Sh...

God Eater photo
God Eater

Your first look at Ufotable's God Eater anime


Chow Down
May 06
// Josh Tolentino
I've mentioned this before, but of the many games that tried to steal Monster Hunter's fire, I liked God Eater the most. While mechanically it was often just "diet" Monster Hunter, its approach to storytelling and anime...
God Eater 2 photo
God Eater 2

Tiger & Bunny power-suits to appear in God Eater 2


Unleash justice on giant honking monsters
Feb 13
// Pedro Cortes
The God Eater 2 official blog revealed their collaboration with Tiger & Bunny. Coming in the version 1.3 patch on Valentine's Day are Kotetsu and Barnaby's power armors as alternate costumes. As you can see in the photos,...
Music photo
Music

The Dose: yu-yu


A beautiful theme from God Eater 2
Dec 17
// Tim Sheehy
Hiroko's out today, so I'm stepping up to the plate. Today's dose features the theme song from God Eater 2, the critically acclaimed action RPG released in Japan last month for both the PSP and PlayStation Vita. Af...
God Eater 2 photo
God Eater 2

Action packed eight minute God Eater 2 play video


All the Gods you can eat
Nov 11
// Elliot Gay
As far as first attempts at hunting action go, Namco Bandai's PSP game God Eater did a bang up job. Rather than outright copy Capcom's success with Monster Hunter, they went in a different direction by amping up the speed of...
God Eater 2 OP photo
God Eater 2 OP

God Eater 2 opening anime is cool as ice


Ufotable delivers the goods
Oct 13
// Elliot Gay
Animation studio Ufotable doesn't exactly handle a whole lot of projects at once, but they put a ton of care and effort into the stuff they do work on. Case in point: God Eater 2's beautiful anime opening up top. For those o...
God Eater 2 trailer photo
God Eater 2 trailer

Latest God Eater 2 video highlights Alisa's episode


She's come a long way since the first game
Oct 12
// Elliot Gay
Namco Bandai's latest hunting action game, God Eater 2, is right around the corner. With its release set for next month, the hype train is chugging along.  This time it brings us a trailer for Alisa's Character Episode....
God Eater 2 photo
God Eater 2

God Eater 2 and The Idolmaster collide for DLC action


And not a single person was surprised
Oct 01
// Elliot Gay
Namco Bandai is teaming up with Lawson convenience stores and HMV to bring preorder The Idolmaster Million Live! DLC to their upcoming PSP/Vita game, God Eater 2.  That's right! Now you too can dress fan favorite Alisa l...
TGS 2013 God Eater 2 Vid photo
TGS 2013 God Eater 2 Vid

TGS 2013: God Eater 2 offscreen Vita TV video


Spoilers: they don't win.
Sep 20
// Elliot Gay
I had the opportunity to go hands on with the most recent build of Namco Bandai's upcoming PSP/Vita hunting game, God Eater 2. Before my preview goes up however, I'm here to deliver an eight minute video of folks playing the...

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