Namco Bandai

Attack on Titan photo
Attack on Titan

Oh, finally, a proper Attack on Titan game


Dynasty Warriors: Giant Cannibals
Aug 09
// Josh Tolentino
What's that, you say? There's already been a proper Attack on Titan game? Well, that is technically true, and Atlus USA even brought it to English-speaking shores as Attack on Titan: Humanity in Chains. Unfortunately, that t...

First Impressions: God Eater episodes 1-3

Jul 30 // Josh Tolentino
The good news is, that visually, God Eater is one of the best-looking shows I've seen in years. And it's not just getting by on style, either. Ufotable, as is their way, has created a technical tour de force with their newest series, using multi-layered shading and coloring techniques to create a unique look for God Eater, as well as finally make an anime where CG creations - in this case, the Aragami monsters and large parts of the backgrounds - don't stick out like a sore thumb.  That doesn't sound huge on its own, but considering the way CG is employed in most traditional 2D anime, it's significant. The few shows to do it well were often all-CG (like Fireball Charming or, err...Sega Hard Girls) or kept the 2D and 3D portions carefully separated (like Ghost in the Shell: Standalone Complex and Etotama). Even Ufotable itself never quite managed the blend with last season's Unlimited Blade Works adaptation. They kept mostly to digital effects, and the CG still looked awkward and out-of-place when used for things like Caster's skeleton warriors or that red water pouring out of the Holy Grail. In most 2D shows, you can usually tell when something's been modeled someone CG comes in just by looking. Whether it's slightly flat colors or an unusual slowness (or smoothness) to the movement, being able to spot the CG in an anime is the "Conspicuously Light Patch" of its age.  To be perfectly honest, that's still technically true in God Eater. It's easy to tell that the Aragami are mostly done in CG, and it's more evident when both monsters and people are on the screen together. Still, the blend on display is better than ever, to the point that after watching the stream on Daisuki, I deliberately sought out a higher-resolution version of the broadcast to see for myself. God Eater just looks that good. More's the pity, then, that the narrative portions of the show simply don't live up to the lavish visuals. In fact, many of the fears some Ufotable fans had about the studio's ability to take on a "heavy" narrative show after five years adapting Type-MOON's "Nasu-verse" for the screen have proven at least partly true so far. Without the dense (and more importantly pre-existing) fiction of the Fate franchise to back it up, God Eater comes across as an Attack on Titan clone where righteous anger has been replaced by a dreary, somewhat undeserved sense of self-importance. It's not all Ufotable's fault, of course. God Eater compared favorably to Monster Hunter in the story department mainly by virtue of actually having a story. As a TV series, God Eater faces much stronger competition, not least of all Ufotable's own stellar work expanding Unlimited Blade Works, just weeks ago. I'd have hoped that they'd be able to make God Eater's world seem less threadbare than in the game, but instead the early results actually seem more stilted than before. In a bitter irony, the game versions of the characters actually seem livelier than in the anime, despite the anime having more "cutscene" in the first three episodes than in the entirety of the game itself. The setup is simple: Ravenous monsters called "Aragami" have destroyed most of humanity, which now hides behind large walled cities under the administration of FENRIR, which employs "God Eaters", warriors that gain superhuman ability when infused with Oracle Cells (the same ones as in the Aragami). God Eaters wield massive weapons called God Arcs to defend mankind's last sanctuaries against the monstrous hordes.  Lenka Utsugi is a newly recruited God Eater in FENRIR's Far East branch. Quite, stoic, and obsessed with taking vengeance upon the Aragami for eating his loved ones, Lenka's a "New-type", who can wield a new, transforming variant of God Arc. His can turn from a massive sword into a massive gun. Being talented, though, makes no substitute for experience, and Lenka's impulsiveness quickly gets him into trouble, forcing the veterans of the 1st Squad, including laid-back badass Lindow Amamiya and his pals Soma and Sakuya to bail him out. Naturally, the kid's got that "something" about him, and by episode 3, Lenka and the squad are working together, and meeting Alisa, another Russian New-type who's got a great hat and, judging by the underboob, might have had the rest of her outfit chosen by her creepy scientist mentor/father-figure. I'm not the kind of guy to go drawing parallels to Attack on Titan When everyone an anime features gross monsters and the people who fight them in a bleakly-toned story, but in this case the parallels are warranted, and unfortunately leave God Eater wanting. The raw anger and passion that underpinned the mood of Eren Jager's saga is here replaced with a dull kind of stoicism. Lenka's strong-but-silent demeanor may be an improvement from the goofball harem tediousness of the God Eater manga's lead, but not by much, and certainly not enough to make Lenka a better lead overall. Worse, points of characterization and flavor that helped the game set a mood in spite of a barebones plot are excised or missing in action here. Story points that might have made God Eater feel less, for lack of a better word, generic, like the privileged status of the God Eater corps or other dynamics, are nowhere to be found, leaving a by-the-numbers "soldiers at the end of the world" moodiness in its place. To be fair, it's still early going, and the show is already forging some newer territory by using flashbacks to the apparent origin of the Aragami and its involvement with FENRIR's higher-ups. It's a sign that Ufotable is beginning to plumb deeper into the lore, which has historically been a strength of theirs as opposed to natural-feeling characterization. Events are moving at a good clip, too, skipping over some of the game's high school shenanigans (at the time used to lazily deploy exposition without spending on animation), so it might not be long before all of it takes a more intriguing turn. Still, there's no avoiding the sense here that some opportunities to make God Eater a more vibrant setting have been missed, and I've no doubt that at least some viewers not hooked on the visuals were turned away by this early narrative blandness. Heck, I'd probably drop the show if I weren't already interested in seeing my favorite MonHun clone get some love.
God Eater photo
No Free Lunch
I've said time and again that God Eater is one of the best - if not the best - attempt yet by competing publishers to take a sip out of Capcom's giant Monster Hunter milkshake. With God Eater, developer Sh...

Tales of Berseria photo
Tales of Berseria

Anchors Aweigh: Tales of Berseria enters the high seas


Let's set sail for adventure!
Jun 22
// Salvador GRodiles
There's something nice about sailing to places in video games. Whether it's Wind Waker's open seas or Skies of Arcadia's vast skies, the idea of exploring vast areas on a ship has always been a thing that I've enjo...
Sword Art Online photo
Sword Art Online

Let's log into Sword Art Online: Lost Song and Re: Hollow Fragment's E3 trailers


Now featuring catchy music
Jun 17
// Salvador GRodiles
For a good while, we've known that Sword Art Online: Lost Song and Re: Hollow Fragment were heading West. With E3 '15 happening as we speak, Bandai Namco has conjured up a new trailer for both games that show off their ...

Naruto: Ninja Storm 4 photo
Naruto: Ninja Storm 4

Naruto: Ultimate Ninja Storm 4 summons the flashy ninja techniques


Gameplay no Jutsu!
Jun 17
// Salvador GRodiles
I may have dropped Naruto back in my early college years, but to this day, I still enjoy the gameplay and ridiculous animations of the series' fighting games by CyberConnect2. Speaking of which, the folks at Bandai Namc...
Summer Lesson photo
Summer Lesson

Summer Lesson is everything right about VR


Thanks, Harada!
Jun 16
// Josh Tolentino
Virtual Reality's a thing, right? The prospect of really putting players "somewhere else" in a more substantial way is just too appealing to dismiss completely. That said, for most of the tech demos out there, that "somewher...
Tales of Zestiria photo
Tales of Zestiria

Huzzah! Tales of Zestiria heads to the PS4 and PC


Now featuring more zesty delicacies
Jun 14
// Salvador GRodiles
I may be super fashionably late to the party, but it's not everyday that a Tales of title gets a special treatment like this. While it's been hinted that Tales of Zestiria was getting a Playstation 4 and PC release for ...
Tales of Berseria photo
Tales of Berseria

The next Tales of game looks beary interesting


Will this title feature a bear motif?
Jun 07
// Salvador GRodiles
As we're waiting for Tales of Zestiria's Western release to hit stores, the folks at Bandai Namco have announced the next Tales of game at the Tales of Festival in Yokohama. From the looks of it, Tales of Berseria might have ...
Sword Art Online photo
Sword Art Online

Rejoice? Sword Art Online: Lost Song and Re: Hollow Fragment go west


Double the pleasure with two SAO games
May 28
// Salvador GRodiles
It was only a matter of time until Bandai Namco would announce that Sword Art Online: Lost Song, the latest SAO video game that takes place in Alfheim Online, would cross the pond. Lo and behold, this inevitabl...
Super Robot Wars BX photo
Super Robot Wars BX

Super Robot War BX's first trailer fills our bodies with delicious courage


All part of a well-balanced diet
May 22
// Salvador GRodiles
If there's one thing that the Super Robot Wars series does right with their trailers, it's that they tend to fill people's hearts with a huge surge of hot-blooded energy. In most cases, this high dosage of enthusiasm can res...
God Eater photo
God Eater

Your first look at Ufotable's God Eater anime


Chow Down
May 06
// Josh Tolentino
I've mentioned this before, but of the many games that tried to steal Monster Hunter's fire, I liked God Eater the most. While mechanically it was often just "diet" Monster Hunter, its approach to storytelling and anime...
3rd Super Robot Wars Z photo
3rd Super Robot Wars Z

Brighten your day with a lengthy 3rd Super Robot Wars Z Part 2 trailer


The best part of waking up is Super Robot Wars on your screen
Mar 02
// Salvador GRodiles
Attention, people; Bandai Namco has launched a 14-minute trailer for 3rd Super Robot Wars Z: Tengoku Hen, which is the perfect cure to obliterate anyone's bad mood. This time around, we're treated to more of the usual action...
Naruto Storm 4 photo
Naruto Storm 4

Is Naruto Ultimate Ninja Storm 4 the last of the series?


Clear skies at last?
Feb 04
// Josh Tolentino
I mean, sure, this new, lengthy video from Bandai Namco showing off in-development gameplay from the latest entry in the Ultimate Ninja Storm franchise has other things to gawp at, like hot particle effects and ridiculo...
Tekken 7 photo
Tekken 7

Meet Shaheen, Tekken's first Saudi character


Say "Salam!"
Jan 06
// Josh Tolentino
Bandai Namco are revving up the hype machine for Tekken 7, and with their latest character reveal, we finally get our first glimpse at what came of that call for feedback Chief Developer Katsuhiro Harada made in August. ...
Naruto: UNS4 photo
Naruto: UNS4

Naruto: Ultimate Ninja Storm 4's first trailer gets straight to the end


More particles, more ninjas, more QTE madness
Dec 22
// Josh Tolentino
The Valley of the End, that is, which, if you're unfamiliar with Naruto history, is a big ol' waterfall created by the final battle between ninja historical figures Madara Uchiha and Hashirama Senju. The location f...
Tales of Zestiria photo
Tales of Zestiria

Tales of Zestiria unleashes some details about its world


Those castles look huge
Dec 16
// Salvador GRodiles
For a good while, we've known that Tales of Zestiria was returning the franchise's roots. Since the game's story involves dragons, it was no surprise that the development team had a medieval fantasy world in mind for the...
Ultimate Ninja Storm 4 photo
Ultimate Ninja Storm 4

Naruto Shippuden Ultimate Ninja Storm 4 takes it to the next-gen


Well, finally!
Dec 15
// Josh Tolentino
Japan isn't very well-known for the phenomenon of annualized franchises, at least not at the level of top-tier triple-A productions like Call of Duty or Assassin's Creed. There are exceptions to that rule, of course, and...
3rd Super Robot Wars Z photo
3rd Super Robot Wars Z

3rd Super Robot Wars Z Part 2's trailer will heat up your blood


Groovin Magic!
Dec 13
// Salvador GRodiles
At long last, Bandai Namco has uploaded the first trailer for 3rd Super Robot Wars Z: Tengoku Hen, and things are looking interesting for Super Robot Wars Z's finale. First and foremost, Diebuster is making its debut in the ...
Tekken 7 photo
Tekken 7

Tekken 7's producer is NOT happy about what you think of his idol


Great job, internet!
Dec 10
// Josh Tolentino
Another day, another teacup-sized tempest. Today's videogame drama is brought to you by Tekken 7, which began its spate of character reveals by leading with a new girl named Lucky Chloe, a blonde, twin-tailed breakdance-figh...
Im@s Cinderella Girls photo
Im@s Cinderella Girls

Idolmaster Cinderella Girls begs for your love and fandom


Fairy Producer
Nov 30
// Josh Tolentino
Given that The Idolm@ster was my favorite anime of its year, I feel almost obligated to find something to like about this new adaptation of Idolm@ster Cinderella Girls, the mobile game spinoff I gave approximately zero ...
Godzilla photo
Godzilla

This Godzilla game trailer tugs at your kaiju-lovin' heart


Also including Godzilla 2014
Nov 22
// Josh Tolentino
And here I was thinking I wouldn't have to cart my PS3 out of the closet anymore. Now Japan's gone and teased a pretty nifty looking Godzilla game, one that's a far cry from the official tie-in app for Hollywood's recen...
Kamen Rider Summonride photo
Kamen Rider Summonride

Kamen Rider Summonride's new screenshots are all about the stages


This gallery needs some boss images
Oct 27
// Salvador GRodiles
Even though Kamen Rider Summonride contains a few features that should've been in the Battride War series (such as a co-op option), I'm still on the fence on whether to Drive the Game or not. As a series of new images enter t...
Digimon All-Star Rumble photo
Digimon All-Star Rumble

Digimon All-Star Rumble's new trailer is all about the Supers


Terra Force!
Oct 08
// Salvador GRodiles
Back when Bandai Namco announced Digimon All-Star Rumble for the PS3 and 360, I ended up having mixed feelings on the news. On one side, it's neat that we're getting a multiplayer party brawler where we can fight as our favo...
Kamen Rider Summonride photo
Kamen Rider Summonride

Kamen Rider Summonride's first trailer gives off a Gauntlet vibe


That kid is way too excited
Oct 05
// Salvador GRodiles
When Bandai Namco announced that they were giving Kamen Rider the Skylanders treatment in Kamen Rider Summonride, I will admit that I was a bit curious about the title will play. Now that the team has shown us the ...
Kamen Rider Summonride photo
Kamen Rider Summonride

What?! Kamen Rider Summonride contains a Skylander-like system


It's time to toy around with with our favorite Riders
Aug 11
// Salvador GRodiles
Oh my. I never expected to see the day that the Kamen Rider franchise would receive a game that'd be similar to Skylanders, Disney Infinity, and Nintendo's Amiibo toys. Then again, both Kamen Rider and Super Sentai have their...
Super Hero Generation photo
Super Hero Generation

Super Hero Generation's first trailer is dynamically delicious


It's Space Jumping Time!
Aug 08
// Salvador GRodiles
It looks like Bandai Namco has uploaded Super Hero Generation's first trailer. Overall, it looks amazing! I mean, what more can I say? The video gives us a nice sample of what to expect from our favorite Gundams, Riders, and...

Review: Kamen Rider Battride War II

Jul 29 // Salvador GRodiles
Kamen Rider Battride War II (PS3 [Regular Edition Reviewed], Wii U) Developer: Eighting Publisher: Bandai Namco Games Release Date: June 26, 2014 MSRP: Regular Edition: ¥ 7,689 [PS3, Wii U], Limited Edition: ¥ 11,286 [PS3, Wii U] Starting off with the latest Kamen Rider series, Kamen Rider Battride War II focuses on Kamen Rider Gaim, Baron, and Ryugen, as they’re sent into a strange movie theater. In this mysterious cinema, the three Riders meet two ghost-like children and suspicious fellow who goes by the name of Sinema. As Kamen Rider Gaim’s characters try to assess the matter at hand, our heroes end up being taken to various realms that Sinema sends them to. Of course, these areas are based off of the Kamen Rider movies from the Heisei Rider shows. [embed]32905:4076:0[/embed] First and foremost, Kamen Rider Battride War II’s plot is very straightforward. Gaim and his crew travel to different stages until they meet up with the other Heisei Riders. Then the players have to help the Heisei Riders win their signature battles in their corresponding films. Aside from that, the game throws in a few surprises when Sinema decides to change things up for our heroes, which acts a way to add variety to the story. Sadly, Battride War II's Chronicle/Story Mode wasn't executed well. Instead of utilizing elements from every Heisei Rider film in existence, Eighting chose to use one film per Rider show. Because of this decision, players were forced to re-battle the game's bosses more than twice. Ironically, this choice was an element that affected the first Battride War game’s quality as well, so it’s a bit disappointing to see that Eighting didn’t learn from their previous mistakes. On top of that, the most of Battride War II’s movie stages are missing certain Riders and monsters that played a major role in the original Heisei Rider films (such as Shadow Moon from the All Riders vs. Dai-Shocker film). Perhaps if Eighting chose to split each film into three stages to represent the movie’s key points (beginning, middle, and end), then we could’ve gotten the chance to battle every Heisei Rider movie villain during the game’s Chronicle Mode. If there’s one good thing about Eighting's involvement with the Battride War series, it's the Riders themselves. Players have access to three special finishing moves that can be executed with the Triangle, Circle, or Triangle and Circle Buttons together. When you press the Square Button, you'll be able to execute the Riders' normal combo. Despite the title’s simplistic combat actions, each Rider is capable of changing various forms, which changes the way how their combos and special moves work. While they could’ve added some branching combos to each character, Eighting still managed to capture the feel of using our favorite Bug-Eyed Heroes against hordes of enemies. Thankfully, Kamen Rider Fourze Base States and Gaim Zenith Arms are capable of doing different moves based on when you press Triangle during their combos, so players at least have the option to use a character with a broader move set. Aside from capturing each Rider’s fighting style, Eighting managed to improve Battride War’s II gameplay. For example, Kamen Rider OOO’s Tajador Combo now has an actual move set, and players are able to equip different Super Forms to Riders like Fourze and Wizard. While we’re on the topic of powerful transformations, if a player changes into a Rider’s Super Form, then they’ll be able to unleash the hero’s ultimate finishing move on your targets. Afterwards, you’ll be able to play as a Super Rider until your special gauge goes down; thus granting players the ability to feel like a true Kamen Rider. In addition to the Riders' Super Forms, Battride War II added an Ultimate System where players can change into the Riders' Movie Forms. Unlike your Super Transformation, the Ultimate Special only increases your strength while slowing down all enemies and bosses on screen. If a Rider lacks an Ultimate Form, then they’ll remain in their Super Form while receiving the Ultimate System’s benefits. Besides the game's two destructive specials, players can now cancel their combos with the X Button. Depending on the Rider that you select, players’ll get to roll, jump, or use a special ability when they cancel a combo. Other gameplay features include the Assist Rider System, which allows players to summon a Rider to hit an enemy or boss with a special attack. Thanks to this system, a good chunk of the Heisei Rider series’ Secondary Riders are now usable in the game. While it’s unfortunate that Kamen Rider Accel, Birth, Meteor, Beast, and Baron are the only playable Supporting Riders, it’s nice to see that Battride War II put some of the other Riders to good use. Best of all, the main Riders can be set to Assist Characters as well, so you’ll have a ton of combinations to experiment with. Since the new system allows you to summon an extra attacker, I found this feature to be very useful when I needed to break out of a boss' combo. All in all, the game's new elements allows players to implement more effective strategies against Battride War II's challenges, which act as a nice warm welcome to the series. When you’re not playing through Battride War II’s story, players have the option to test their skills in the game’s Survival Mode. In this segment, you’ll get to fight your way through random stages while overcoming various handicaps, which is very similar to the Rider Road Mode from the first game. If you managed to reign supreme, then you’ll be rewarded with special Figures that can be used to improve each Rider’s ability. Unlike the first Battride War, the Figures can now increase a Rider’s stats while retaining their special abilities. On top of that, the Toys are now capable of leveling up in battle, which adds a neat layer to the game itself. Unfortunately, Survival Mode is the only way for you to unlock Figures, so you’ll want to switch between the title's two options if you want to awaken your favorite characters true potential. Despite Eighting's attempt to improve Battride War II’s gameplay, this didn’t save the title from its flaws. Besides battling human-sized bosses, the team decided to add giant adversaries to the game’s sequel. While this concept sounds great on paper, the battles themselves were annoying to get through. Since it seemed that Eighting didn’t program the large boss’ hit-boxes properly, I found it very difficult to land a hit on most the title’s huge enemies. Compared to games like the Monster Hunter series, I felt that my attacks had little to no impact on the title's ginormous foes. Thankfully, these battles weren’t frequent, so it wasn’t enough to turn Battride War II into a terrible game. Other than that, it's still unfortunate that players can't run over enemies with their motorcycles, and the lack of a co-op option continues to be two minor recurring issues that have yet to be resolved. Besides my issues with most of the game's mechanics, I encountered a few glitches in Battride War II that prevented me from clearing certain stages. On a few occasions, I fell through the stage, which meant that I had to replay the entire level all over again. Luckily, I only encountered this bug twice, so there’s a chance that it might not happen too frequently. Other issues include the game's sound muting in most areas, and a freezing issue that occurs when you continuously use your Ultimate in any area that takes place in the castle from the Kamen Rider Wizard movie. While none of these glitches have messed with my game file, they can be annoying when you’re doing great during certain stages in Battride War II. As for Battride War II’s graphics, the game looks no different from the first title, as it still looks like an early PS3 game with HD PS2 quality environments. In fact, many of Battride War’s previous assets were recycled in the second installment. From the stages to the Riders and enemies from Kuuga to Wizard, none of these aspects were given a graphical update. While the Kamen Rider franchise has been known for reusing sets and locations, this doesn’t mean that Eighting should use the designs from the previous game without improving them. Despite being a person who favors gameplay over graphics, I felt that Battride War II could've look a bit better to warrant the title’s retail price. On a more positive note, the second game’s animations are better than before, which meant that Eighting touched up the characters who didn't receive new moves and/or Forms. Music wise, the game's soundtrack was disappointing, as each track felt like a generic freeware song or a rejected Kamen Rider battle theme. Sure, “Break the Shell” by Kamen Rider Girls was amazing, but one tune isn’t enough to save Battride War II’s entire music track. Luckily, players are given the option to create a Custom Soundtrack with any song that's on their PS3 console. On top of that, you also have the option to decide when the game plays your selected tracks (such as the menu, stage music, or the Riders’ transformation themes), which can be set to each Rider as well. Thanks to this feature, players can bypass the game’s mediocre tunes. Overall, Kamen Rider Battride War II had the potential to be a great game for the franchise's viewers, but the title's various flaws held it back from becoming a fine product. Even then, it was still a blast to obliterate waves of enemies with the Riders that Battride War II had to offer. While the title has enough content to please most Kamen Rider fans, I recommend waiting for Battride War II to go down in price before diving in. In the meantime, if you’re interested in a good Kamen Rider action game, then I recommend checking out All Kamen Rider: Rider Generation 2 for the PSP or DS, since it’s a beat em’ up title that contains over 50 Riders and villains. 6 -- Alright (6s may be slightly above average or simply inoffensive. Fans of the genre should enjoy them a bit, but a fair few will be left unfulfilled.)
Import Review photo
Journey through the Decayed
Back when Kamen Rider Battride War was first announced, many toku fans were excited over the fact that they were getting a Dynasty Warriors-like game that featured their favorite Heisei Riders from Kamen Rider Kuuga...

Super Hero Generation photo
Super Hero Generation

Gundams, Riders, and Ultra Warriors join forces in Super Hero Generation


Shabadoobie, touch to team up!
Jul 09
// Salvador GRodiles
It's been a year since Bandai Namco's released a Compatible Hero game, as Heroes VS came out in 2013. Lo and behold, the team's ready to have the heroes from the Kamen Rider, Gundam, and Ultra series reunite in a new adv...
Gundam: RiG photo
Gundam: RiG

Gundam: Reconguista in G gets way more info


Tomino's latest Gundam show gets detailed
Jun 23
// Pedro Cortes
Sunrise dropped a ton of new info on the official Gundam: Reconguista in G website. In addition to a newly available trailer, we now have updated info on staff and cast, as well as several of the main 'bots you'll be seeing ...
Kamen Rider photo
Kamen Rider

Watch Part 2 of Kamen Rider Girls' Kamen Rider Battride War II playthrough


Gaim's gameplay is looking great
Jun 17
// Salvador GRodiles
It's been three weeks since we last saw the Kamen Rider Girls play Kamen Rider Battride War II. Now the idol group is back to try out Kamen Rider Kiva, Den-O, Gaim, and Wizard. Unlike Bandai Namco's last video...

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