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Japanator Live photo
Japanator Live

Japanator LIVE - Nier Automata


Gravity Rush 2 Demo too!
Jan 04
// Red Veron
[Stream will begin at 10PM US Central Time over at the Japanator YouTube page and the video of the stream will also be posted here during and after the stream, so check it out!]   The new year is fin...
Japanator Live photo
Japanator Live

Japanator LIVE - World of Final Fantasy


World of Zippers and Buttons
Oct 17
// Red Veron
[Stream will begin at 10PM US Central Time over at the Japanator YouTube page and the video of the stream will also be posted here during and after the stream, so check it out!] The demo of World of Final...
Japanator Live photo
Japanator Live

Japanator LIVE - Dragon Quest Builders


Slimecraft
Oct 11
// Red Veron
[Stream will begin at 9PM US Central Time over at the Japanator YouTube page and the video of the stream will also be posted here during and after the stream, so check it out!] Dragon Quest Builders is finally...

Impressions: Dragon Quest Builders Demo

Sep 28 // Red Veron
Dragon Quest Builders (PlayStation 4, PlayStation Vita)Developer: Square EnixPublisher: Square EnixRelease Date: January 28, 2016 (JP), October 11. 2016 (NA), October 14, 2016 (EU)MSRP: $59.99 (PlayStation 4) You may have heard of Dragon Quest before, it's a role-playing game series that had its start in Japan in the late 80's on the Nintendo Family Computer (the Japanese Nintendo Entertainment System) and has become pretty much an institution in Japanese culture. Japan loves this series so much, you've probably seen references to Dragon Quest in different Japanese media and you probably might have not noticed. Dragon Quest also part of that popular urban legend of video game stores having to release the game on weekends so schoolkids wouldn't skip class to pick up the latest entry in the series. There have been many attempts to bring the series to the US, but the timing has always been not quite right. Now, we have a very unlikely Dragon Quest spinoff and it is borrowing elements from one of the biggest games in the last decade: Minecraft. While the series has had many spinoffs in other genres, this attempt of creating a sandbox exploration and creation adventure game actually does a really good job. Dragon Quest Builders is set in a world that is generations after the first Dragon Quest game, where the hero in original Dragon Quest chooses to rule half the world with the Dragonlord, the final boss in the game. Of course, the Dragonlord being the big bad, betrays the hero and plunges the world into darkness, along with it, robbing humanity the ability build things. So it is now generations later and players will take on the role of the "Builder", who must save the world from the Dragonlord by building stuff and using said stuff to defeat the Dragonlord. The game has a story, which is not really common in the sandbox-creation-exploration genre, progression is tied to the narrative that also tries to teach you how to do things and keeps you on a track with some freedom in between. This demo covers only very little of the game, so we don't get much of an idea as to how much freedom there is compared to the full game. The demo is the first hour and a half of the Dragon Quest Builders, teaching you the different mechanics of the game as your progress with the story. You are slowly given bits of the narrative while learning the basics such crafting, resource gathering, combat, and other parts from early in the game. Base building is also part of the game, players get to build a town (which is more like a base) and this demo shows a little bit of that mechanic. Building up the town attracts people to help build up the town as well as add more ways to item crafting. The other side to base building is also defending it against monsters aligned with the big bad Dragonlord who will attack your town from time to time. Defenses can be built to keep monsters from destroying your base and townsfolk will also help you fight.  Combat in the demo is basic, only two melee weapons are available, a stick and a club. They do fine against most of the enemies you encounter, except for the dragon which takes a while to fight with such weak weapons. Crafting is easy, all made in a menu at crafting stations, just gather the right items and you can make what is needed. Dragon Quest Builders just looks really good, the chibi-styled Dragon Quest characters look very faithful to the series, as well the much more recognized monsters such as the Slime monsters, the series' de facto mascot. Monsters act like they do in the recent games they are from, attacks and sound cues as well. The game shows off more of its Dragon Quest heritage with much of the iconography in the game are ripped straight from the series. Familiar items are abundant, from healing items to even chimera wings, which is a mainstay in the Dragon Quest games and function the same way. Another way this game shows off its Dragon Quest DNA is through the music. The lovely and soothing orchestral Dragon Quest music is present and just perfect for this new genre where hours fade away. This music is perfect since it was also made for Japanese RPGs that take dozens of hours to complete and it won't drive you crazy from hearing it over and over again. The game's camera can be finicky at times, it zooms in when you're in tight spaces. When you're running through a forest with plenty of trees, it can be hard to see items and enemies under the foliage and will require you to maneuver the camera low for the best view. There is a transparency effect that lets you see through it but it is only wide enough to see a little bit around your character and can make it hard to be able to see enemies near you. These problems with the camera are not a big deal and don't really pop up often. The minor problems are only in the cases I mentioned above, most of the environments are open and controlling the camera isn't difficult. Block placement can be imprecise at times, since the cursor isn't always present and defaults to where your character is facing (which isn't always clearly defined). Placing objects where you don't intend to place them does happen but you don't get penalized for breaking them down (unlike in Minecraft where crafted objects revert to the raw materials) and you only take a very small reduction to the durability of the tool used to break it down. (Update: You can hold L1 & R1 /L & R buttons to be able to precisely stack blocks in front of you.) The small slice of the world in the demo might seem large at first but once the demo is over, you may find it small and a bit empty. However, those who choose to explore the island in the demo will be in for a bit of a treat. Getting to the other side of the mountain will let you see a bit more of the game. There is a little bit more to see but it's not much, though it gives you a better idea of the scale of this world. The Dragon Quest Builders demo is short but it left me wanting more places to explore and build, which is what a demo should do. I played for more than two hours of the demo I enjoyed almost every single moment of it. There's a lot of the world to explore and many things to build, and I cannot wait to get my hands on a copy of the game. After looking at people playing the Japanese version, I realized just how little this demo is compared to the vast amount of content in the full game. [embed]35296:5867:0[/embed]
Dragon Quest Builders photo
Save the world one piece at a time
Last night, I streamed Dragon Quest Builders on Japanator Live, the latest spinoff of  Dragon Quest series that takes a lot of inspiration from the sandbox creation genre (made popular by Minecraft) and infuses...


Japanator Live photo
Japanator Live

Japanator LIVE: Rebuild with Dragon Quest Builders


Save the world one piece at a time
Sep 27
// Red Veron
[Stream will begin at 10PM US Central Time over at the Japanator YouTube page] The demo for the highly anticipated Dragon Quest Builders just arrived on the US PlayStation store today and we are taking a look at it ...
Japanator Live photo
Japanator Live

Japanator LIVE: Take a few bites with God Eater 2


Give it a taste
Sep 21
// Red Veron
[Stream will begin at 10PM US Central Time over at the Japanator YouTube page] Hello, lovely viewers! It's been a while since I've done a stream and now I've got a game that recently came out that I also reviewed here on Jap...

Japanator Unboxing: Persona 5 20th Anniversary Edition

Sep 15 // Christian Chiok
[embed]35263:5841:0[/embed]
Persona 5 photo
Take Your Heart
Persona 5, one of the most anticipated games of the year, has finally hit Japanese shelves as well as the PlayStation Network. We were blessed with the opportunity to obtain the Persona 5 20th Anniversary Edition which i...

Digimon World photo
Digimon World

Digimon World: Next Order coming to PS4 next year


Reigning champions
Sep 15
// Nick Valdez
[Update 2: Bandai Namco made a mistake in the announcement. The game is only heading to PS4 physically and digitally.] [Update: Bandai Namco confirmed that it was heading to the Vita as well.] Thanks to Digimon Story: C...

Review: God Eater 2: Rage Burst

Sep 14 // Red Veron
GOD EATER 2: Rage Burst (PlayStation 4 [Reviewed], PlayStation Vita, PC)Developer: ShiftPublisher: Banday Namco EntertainmentReleased: August 30, 2016 (NA/EU), February 19, 2015MSRP: $59.99 (PS4), $49.99 (PC), $39.99 (Vita) God Eater 2: Rage Burst is the expanded version of the sequel to God Eater, much like how the original God Eater on PSP made it outside Japan. This is a new expanded version of the God Eater 2, a sequel that the west never got that will please those who've waited years since the first God Eater in 2010, especially for those who enjoyed all the new stuff in the recent remake, God Eater Resurrection. The God Eater games are the only games that can even come close to Monster Hunter, while it is of that Hunting genre, it is much more accessible than the Monster Hunter. It's much more fast-paced all  around and lacks the animation nuances that are in most of the Monster Hunter games. The God Eater games do a good job in teaching the basics and ease players into the flow of a Hunting game, without having to spend hours learning everything as it integrates it all of into the game with a story to spice up the gameplay. A lot of the new features we saw in the enhanced remake God Eater Resurrection were from God Eater 2: Rage Burst, but that was just a small taste of all the new features that improved the formula. One thing that returning gamers might notice is there is a bit of reused content from the previous game, God Eater Resurrection. While reusing levels and assets are quite common in games in the Hunting genre, there are a bit of changes to the content that give them a different feel, though it may only be noticed by those paying close attention. This is also due to the fact that Resurrection came out after Rage Burst, so being made around the same time can result in recycling but the two games are different enough from each other in terms of mechanics and in the new content. One of the new additions to the God Eater formula are the Blood Arts, which add some oomph to each type of attack and varies by weapon, such as powering up your attacks and you can choose whichever suits the situation and/or your style. Another welcome addition is being able to add skills to weapons and shield that give bonus stats to the player which is available pretty early in the game. These are only a few of the new additions that add so much more ways to plays and more customization for weapons over the previous game. While there are a lot of ways to customize, you only have to fiddle with your gear for only a little bit and it is mostly optional. As I've mentioned in my review for God Eater Resurrection, those wanting to dive into the franchise and play the best version should just play God Eater 2: Rage Burst. This sequel is also much more friendlier to those new to the genre and is solo friendly for those not wanting to touch the online multiplayer mode. One way that it makes it easier to get into and/or play solo is to take advantage of all the new customization features to make your character stronger so you can hold your own enough to learn the basics. Though there are all these options that make the introduction to this game and genre much easier, they aren't communicated to the player in the clearest fashion. It requires a bit of digging into all the menus to actually get those 'help' explanations. It can get confusing for those unfamiliar, but with some patience, one can learn enough of the mechanics to blaze through the game. Returning players might breeze through much of the story mode and veterans might find it a bit easy, but there are a set of harder missions that are available to play early in the game for those looking for a challenge and want to try out all the new game elements. The game does ramp up later and gives a proper challenge with new enemies and harder scenarios. [embed]35233:5839:0[/embed] Rage Burst places the player as the newest recruit in the Blood Special Forces unit, a special group of God Eaters who are an elite unit that are the only ones who can fight the new species of Aragami. We get introduced to a new cast of characters and we also get to see characters and places from the previous game. You can also get to know these new characters in 'Character Episodes', which are side stories that let you get to know more of these new characters and along with some extra missions. There's a story told through many cutscenes, while the story isn't dense, it sure takes its sweet time to unfold and can be a plus for those wanting something to break up the monotony of the hunting game grind. The rate of which of the story unfolds can be a drawback for those who don't want to invest dozens of hours into the game. The parts of the story feel like episodes in an anime series, that are broken up into pieces but kind of build on each other. But the game is playable in short sessions where most missions can knocked out in under 5 to 10 minutes, so those with an hour to spare can get a good chunk of some hack-and-slash action. Those purchasing Rage Burst on Steam and PS4 near launch will also get God Eater Resurrection (along with some costumes from Sword Art Online, Tokyo Ghoul, and Tales of Zestiria), making it a good value, though playing Resurrection is not needed to enjoy Rage Burst but it helps in world building. These costumes only provide cosmetic changes, and hopefully we get more in the future (PLEASE BRING OVER THE GINTAMA COSTUMES). God Eater 2: Rage Burst is the best way to get into the hunting genre right now for many reasons; it's easy enough to pick up, it has a lot to offer, and it has online multiplayer for those wanting to play with people. This game is good for those wanting to dip their toe into hunting games for the first time. Those returning to God Eater will find enjoyment in the new variety of features in this new installment, but some veterans may feel that it's not enough new stuff especially after recently playing the enhanced remake of the first game. But there's still enough to get out of this new game, Rage Burst shines more with what's under the surface, those willing to dig in deeper will find a lot of good things and a good time.
God Eater 2: Rage Burst photo
New Look, Same Great Taste
Monster Hunter is one of the behemoths of gaming in Japan, it still sells like crazy every time and has made its own genre (Yes, I know about Phantasy Star Online). Many have tried to hunt down the same success but only one f...

Persona 5 photo
Persona 5

PS4 and Persona 5 get dramatic price drop song commercial


NIMANKYUSENKYUHYAKUHACHIJYUYEN
Sep 08
// Red Veron
Two new PlayStation 4 models just got announced yesterday, where the original PlayStation 4 got a price drop to $299 (or 29,980 Yen in Japan) in the form of a new sleeker slim model. In the US, Sony conducted one of their "P...
PS4 Pro photo
PS4 Pro

Say hello to the next PlayStation, the PS4 Pro


And its smaller, cheaper buddy
Sep 07
// Josh Tolentino
The image above has pretty much covered all the necessary information, but in case our server's acting wonky or you're a details type of person, here's the skinny: After months of rumors, leaks, broken street dates, and specu...
Chroma Squad photo
Chroma Squad

Let's Chromatize: Chroma Squad heads to home consoles next year


It's time for some colorful explosions
Sep 02
// Salvador G Rodiles
It may have taken a while, but the gang at Behold Studios are now closer to helping Chroma Squad achieve its new form on the home consoles. Thanks to the help of Bandai Namco, the game will morph its way to the PS4, Xbox...
Touhou photo
Touhou

Touhou: Scarlet Curiosity will obliterate your boredom on Sept. 20


Immortality is overrated
Sep 02
// Salvador G Rodiles
Well, folks. It looks like we're in for a September that's filled with lots of colorful bullets since Touhou: Scarlet Curiosity, the Touhou fan game by Ankake Spa that gives off a Ys: The Oath in Felghana and Ys Origins ...
Steins;Gate 0 photo
Steins;Gate 0

Grab your lab coats: Steins;Gate 0 gets a more affordable limited edition


It's time to open another Dr. Pepper
Aug 23
// Salvador G Rodiles
If you feel that you won't be able to afford Stein;Gate 0's Amadeus Edition for the PS4 and Vita, the gang at PQube have concocted a new option for folks who want something special with their copy of the game. While this...

Review: The King of Fighters XIV

Aug 22 // Christian Chiok
[embed]35211:5799:0[/embed] The King of Fighters XIV (PlayStation 4)Developer: SNKPublisher: Atlus USAReleased: August 23, 2016 (US), August 26, 2016 (EU), August 25, 2016 (JP)MSRP: $59.99 Regardless, I decided to be open-minded and not completely trash the game, so I was still looking forward to it, but with less excitement compared to XII, however. I definitely made the right decision of still giving the game the chance since as the months went by, and as information came in, the game was shaping up to be good, and definitely a lot more robust than one of its competitors when it came to content.   King of Fighters XIV marks the beginning of a new canonical saga for the series. Compared to previous entries, I don’t think the story is that exciting this time around since the story is more streamlined compared to other King of Fighters.  The story revolves around a billionaire known as Antonov, who claimed to be the “first champion” of the KOF tournament and bought out all of the rights for the KOF Tournament. His announcement of a new KOF Tournament created unprecedented enthusiasm around the world. From there, this excitement reached many of the veteran participants of the legendary tournament directly in the form of an official invitation. After finishing up Story Mode, which should be fairly quick, there are other modes you can try out like Versus Mode, Training, Online, Mission and Tutorial. Naturally, Versus Mode is just like previous King of Fighters where it gives you the option to do both Single and Team VS matches. After selecting your character, you got a handful of handicaps you can choose from, such as 50% health, 75% health, an extra bar of power gauge and lastly your power gauge completely filled. After that, you choose your stage and the rest is history. Practice Mode offers a variety of options that will help you on your training such as changing the position of you and your opponent, change whether they are standing, crouching, jumping, as well as have the AI completely take over. You can also set up so the training dummy guards, counters and recovers.  All of this is definitely good if you want to have great training sessions. Additionally, there’s also Tutorial Mode which shows you the ropes. It helps if you’re new to the series or fighting games in general. Mission Mode consists of Trial, Time Attack, and Survival. In Trial, you will attempt a set of challenges for each character. They usually consist of pulling off combos.  Time Attack and Survival both are self-explanatory. I personally liked playing through Trial since it helped me out practice some combos for some of the characters that I used. Now to address the elephant in the room—Online mode. The previous game, King of Fighters XIII, was known for its awful netcode on consoles. While the Steam version heavily improved this, it still wasn’t perfect.  It’s really noticeable that they actually worked hard to improve the netcode in this game. I played around 10 matches or so without any lag—I had a smooth experience all around. Additionally, the game offers some features that make the online better as well. Ranked Match takes you straight into a 3-Man Team Battle, which affects your rank depending whether you win or lose. For advanced players, it gives you the option to play 10 battles and depending in your wins, it sets you into a Rank much faster.  Free Match is most robust as it gives you more modes to play such as Team VS, Single VS and Party VS. The first two work just as if you were playing offline with another player in the same room. What I really love is the addition of Party VS, which lets six players instead in a 3-on-3 fight. If you got a group of friends, it’s definitely a lot of fun. Room settings are the same as any fighting game in general, such as making the room public or private, the number of players, the round time, and the number of rounds. Inside a room, you’re allowed to play multiple set ups, such as Tourney, Elimination and Series. Tourney removes the losing player after the fight, Elimination removes the winning player after the fight while Series allows you to face the same opponent continuously. There’s also Online Training, which allows you to train with a friend online. This is definitely helpful for those who lack a training partner outside of the Internet. Naturally, there’s also Online Replay, which you can view all the replays submitted by players, whether it’s Team VS or Single VS matches. Spectators can join to watch the match up with an integrated voice and text chat. Additionally, a "Crowd SE" option is available for spectators, which allows them to root, applaud, and boo the match current players.There's also a Live feature, but that's just a shortcut to game's Live from PlayStation menu. While the game resembles the Maximum Impact series graphically, it still remains on a strictly two-dimensional plane and keeps the same basic mechanics as its predecessors. New features have been added such as a new Max mode system, allowing players to access the EX moves, which can be activated by using one bar of the power gauge. Additionally, using three bars of the power gauge can allow players to unleash Climax supers. With the game catering to newcomers as well, the added a feature called Rush Mode, which is similar to games like Dengeki Bunko and Persona 4 Arena. Just like those games, it can be activated by repeatedly hitting the light punch button, however, will do lower damage compared to normal combo attacks. While I’m certainly not a fan of these types of things, it doesn’t really hurt the game either. Overall, I am definitely pleased with King of Fighters XIV. While the story was kind of bland compared to the previous games, and the graphics are a bit disappointing, it still offers a great experience that both King of Fighters fans and fighting game fans can appreciate. There’s just so much content from the get-go, like a game should, that can keep you occupied for a while. It definitely makes up for the game's flaws. You can bet I'll be playing this for months. 
The King of Fighters XIV photo
Burn To Fight
Since I’ve been writing for Japanator for almost a year now, some of you may already know I’m a big King of Fighters fan and it’s one of the first series I ever played as a child. Even since then I haven&rsq...

Final Fantasy XV photo
Final Fantasy XV

Despair: Final Fantasy XV delayed to late Fall


A special message from the director
Aug 15
// Josh Tolentino
One of the most remarkable things about Final Fantasy XV's development isn't its epic length, but how open the process has been over the last couple of years. Since the reins were handed over to director Hajime Tabata (who ha...

Review: Romance of the Three Kingdoms XIII

Aug 07 // Christian Chiok
[embed]35186:5776:0[/embed] Romance of the Three Kingdoms XIII (PlayStation 4 [reviewed], PC)Developer: Koei TecmoPublisher: Koei TecmoReleased: July 5, 2016 (US), July 8, 2016 (EU), January 28, 2016 (JP)MSRP: $59.99 Right off the bat I could tell how deep the game is, and I was going to have a hard time learning the many features the game offered, as it easily one of the deepest game in the PS4 library. As a matter of fact, the game doesn’t do a great job of explaining many of the features to new players, so trying to play through the first few hours were really overwhelming. When booting the game, you get a message that it’s recommended to play through Hero Mode, otherwise known as the game’s Tutorial Mode, to get a good grasps of the game. Immediately as the game showed the introduction, it captivated me and couldn’t wait to progress through the game. At first, the game holds your hand a little bit, pointing out what you need to do and such, as well as explaining the game features. After that though, I couldn’t help to feel a little lost on the mechanics. I spent a few hours fooling around with the game so I can get a good grasp of it. With help, I was able to manage and get a decent understanding of the game, so I proceeded to the main mode, in which traditionally offers a different scenarios to play. The main goal of the game is to stabilize your territory, gain more officers, conquer more territory, and ultimately unify the land, under the flag of Han, Wei, Wu, Shu, Zhong, Jin, or another force. To accomplish this, players will be using the several options and sub-options to increase your territory domestically, which you can do so by appointing yourself or one of your men to the tasks such as Commerce, Farming and Culture. Commerce gives gold, which you can use to pay your officers. Farming feeds your men. Culture attracts people. You can also improve your territory militarily, which is done by hiring new officers. The battle system in Romance of the Three Kingdoms XIII is similar to the previous games, where you encounters an enemy force and takes control of the battle. Otherwise, the AI will decide the outcome. When taking control of the battle, you will leave the world map and enter a more detailed battle map. How it looks depends on where you encounter your opponent, so it can be on the ourskirts, near a city, in a forest. Romance of the Three Kingdoms shares the same epic cinematics found in the Dynasty Warriors series, though not as dynamic and animated. Instead, the cutscenes are still images with little animation. However, it still has that epic feel thanks to the voice acting and the effects added to them. Though I would have proffered if the game had fully animated cutscenes. The soundtrack is also as amazing as in the Dynasty Warriors games as well. As hard as it was to get into at first, I did enjoy my time with the game, such as plotting my dominion over China as well as growing my civilization through the basics of successful commerce, culture, farming and military training. However, after investing my time into it, I don’t think it’s my type of game either. I personally think that Romance of the Three Kingdoms is far from a bad game for what it offers, and I can really appreciate a game that offers a lot of depth. However, as a newcomer to the series, it was really difficult and frustrating for me to get into it at first. According to friends familiar with the series, this was probably a bad entry to start with, and I should play ROTTK10 instead to get into the series, and if you want to get in to the series, I would advise to do so as well. Otherwise, it’s probably a good game for veterans of the series.  [This review is based on a copy of the game provided by the publisher.]
ROTTK photo
Expand Your Empire
Being interested in Japanese culture, learning about the Sengoku era came with the territory. While learning about the history about the era as well as its historical figures, I stumbled upon Samurai Warriors back in late 200...

Review: God Eater Resurrection

Jul 28 // Red Veron
God Eater Resurrection (Playstation 4 [Tested], PlayStation Vita [Reviewed], PlayStation TV [Reviewed], PC)Developer: ShiftPublisher: Bandai Namco EntertainmentRelease Date: October 15, 2015 (JP), June 28, 2016 (NA), August 30, 2016 (EU, PC)MSRP: $19.99 The God Eater games have always been visually unique, unlike the many medieval fantasy-like set Hunting games, God Eater differentiates itself with a post-apocalyptic, dystopian science fiction setting coupled with fashionable anime character designs that look straight off the streets of Tokyo. First released for the PlayStation Portable in 2010 in the USA under the renamed title Gods Eater Burst (to not offend those who believe in only one god), the game never had a chance to show its stuff due to the PlayStation Portable being deemed commercially dead in the US at the time. Now in 2016, God Eater gets another chance in the west with God Eater Resurrection. Don't think that this is just a simple remaster, this enhanced remake serves up a second helping that brings more than a visual upgrade and retroactively receives new content from the sequel and the recent anime adaptation. The new added content comes in the form of weapons, moves, voice acting, story elements, and new enemies as well as changes to the old enemies. God Eater is set decades in the future where creatures called Aragami have climbed to the top of the food chain and what's left of humanity fights to survive everyday. The eponymous "God Eaters" are the wielders of  special weapons are called "God Arcs", giant blade weapons that are the only ones that can slay the Aragami, and can grow a giant pair of sharp jaws that can take a bite out of the Aragami to extract temporary buffs and materials from the enemy. The "-gami" in Aragami means god (which in this case they are powerful beings), hence the title "God Eater". God Eater Resurrection is a hunting game in the vein of Monster Hunter, but with with its own take on the formula and is much more accessible than most of the older Monster Hunter games that came out before it in 2010. The combat of God Eater leans toward more of an hack-and-slash action game than the more methodical timing in the combat of Monster Hunter. God Eater's God Arc alternates between a melee and ranged weapon, both of which have different types each that allow for different combination of play styles.  The first few missions are short and ease you in to the hunting mechanics while you shoot and wail away at the enemies, it does a quick job in getting you going compared to most other Hunting games. God Eater is still true to the genre and has you going on missions to gather materials (though not to same degree as Monster Hunter) from enemies and the environment to improve your gear and learning the different ways to effectively fight the enemies. Among the unique ways to fight enemies effectively is a bullet customization system (revised in this new version) for the bullets fired from the God Arc which allows for unique ways to fight with the different combinations of elemental and projectile types. This new version also adds in new weaponry from the sequel, God Eater 2: Rage Burst, that gives players a new way to play such as the Valiant Scythe and the Boost Hammer. New additions include "Predator" moves that allow you to bite enemies in different ways to activate ability boosts. Do not let the accessibility of the game fool you, there is a lot of depth with the combat and even more with this new version. Utilizing everything at your disposal, from equipment to tactics, to give you an advantage in defeating your enemies is still paramount in getting far into this game, especially for near endgame content and beyond. God Eater Resurrection still plays very much like the original but with the added benefit of the right stick for improved camera controls and adds a host of control options. It also takes advantage of the new platform with options to use the touch controls on the Vita, which makes me favor the handheld version over the prettier console version. The corners of the Vita's touchscreen, as well as the R3 and L3 buttons on the controller enabled versions of the game, can be assigned to function as extra buttons that either let you quickly access items, team commands, or the map menu. Playing the Vita version on the PlayStation TV microconsole provides a very close core experience to the PlayStation 4 version just without the extra graphical muscle and PlayStation 4 console functionality. The Vita version does have that lack of anti-aliasing but is easily overlooked since still looks good with its nice anime art style and keeps up even in the graphically intense fights in the game. God Eater Resurrection allows cross-save and cross-play between the PlayStation 4 and PlayStation Vita it will be easier to find people to play with, which is important and is a fun time for a hunting game. God Eater Resurrection is rather affordable at $19.99 and not bad for those wanting to check out a solid hunting game experience for not a lot of money, but do check out those special offers where you can get God Eater Resurrection for free when you preorder God Eater 2: Rage Burst on the PlayStation. These offers vary by territory and is a nice way to check out the original as well as get yourself a newer hunting game. All the new added content, better controls and visuals serve to improve the experience quite a lot from the original release. However, the game still feels too similar to the original game, it feels like an older game in the genre, along with the limitations of the original platform. Shift, the developer of this God Eater Resurrection whose prior work the year before, the impressive Freedom Wars, improves on the hunting genre in many ways but not much of those improvements made it back into God Eater Resurrection. Those wanting more of a modern experience may just want to check out the second game, which releases a little after the North American release of God Eater Resurrection. If you are a God Eater veteran and have time for a refresher before the sequel God Eater 2: Rage Burst hits, it is definitely worth it to check it out. If don't have the time to commit, you can skip this one and probably check out some summaries of the new story content out there on the internet to get you ready for the sequel and there's even that anime adaptation to supplement the experience. God Eater Resurrection is a good introduction to the franchise and the genre, overall a good game with the new bells and whistles but is showing its age in a world where newer hunting games exist. 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God Eater Resurrection photo
Back for Seconds
The Monster Hunter franchise's meteoric rise in Japan in the past decade has given birth to a new genre that is still going strong in Japan with numerous contenders that spring up every so often. While many Japanese game...

Review: JoJo's Bizarre Adventure: Eyes of Heaven

Jul 11 // Nick Valdez
[embed]35131:5738:0[/embed] JoJo's Bizzare Adventure: Eyes of Heaven (PS4 [reviewed] and PS3) Developer: CyberConnect2Publisher: Bandai Namco EntertainmentReleased: December 17, 2015 (JP), June 28, 2016 (NA), July 1, 2016 (EU)MSRP: $59.99 With a story overseen by series creator Hirohiko Araki, JoJo's Bizarre Adventure: Eyes of Heaven takes place after the events of the manga's arguably most recognizable arc, Stardust Crusaders. After Jotaro Kujo and crew defeat the evil vampire Dio, Jotaro is suddenly caught up in a new adventure. As deceased friends come back to life and start attacking thanks to the effects of a purple fog, Jotaro and the gang realize they have to collect pieces of a mystical item called the Holy Corpse across different periods of time and space. Then time shenanigans lead to an overpowered villain who can alter reality and every iteration of the eight generation strong JoJo family must band together to stop them.  Eyes of Heaven is created with fans in mind, so unfortunately, they are the only ones who can truly appreciate what the game has to offer. Other than a brief summary detailing the final events of each arc before story chapters, there is no real introduction to the game's 50+ characters (all unlocked from the jump). Assuming you already know every member of the cast, the game's central plot moves at a breakneck pace with characters constantly being introduced through its six to seven hour run time. The only problem with this being that even while you end up fighting some characters multiple times (as the game continues to pad its short plot with repetitive battles), you never learn anything new about them even when there is plenty opportunity to do so. But in that same breath, the plot itself is just a huge excuse to give into "fandemonium" and give fans situations that would not normally occur otherwise. For example, seeing 17-year-old Jotaro interact with his 20-something-year-old future daughter from Part 6 lead to some cute exchanges between the two. I know JoJo is not a show known for its plot, but the property's charm stems from it essentially making mountains out of molehills. Eyes of Heaven had the potential for a great, hilariously dramatic JoJo story but lacks the follow through of a traditional manga arc. That seems to be the problem with the title overall. Lots of Heaven's problems are rooted in poor follow through. So many interesting ideas are crushed under the weight of its poor systems. Beyond Eyes of Heaven's story mode, the core of the game is focused on its battle system. Each fight is a two vs. two affair (which can involve four players online if at least four people have the game, which I have yet to see myself or even connect to on Heaven's piss poor netcode) on a 3D map littered with pitfalls and hazards a la games like Power Stone. Unlike most arena fighters, however, each attack has cooldown times meaning you cannot spam skills as you wish. To counter these skills, each character also comes equipped with a rechargeable "Flash" gauge with allows them to either break out of a characters combo or cancel their skills mid-attack. Coupled with the team based Dual Combo system (which builds up a meter with you and your computer controlled partner's hits before a super finish) and Dual Heat Attacks (which unite both characters in a flashy super skill) and you could potentially do a lot of damage. The problem is the game is incredibly stiff and it's got quite the adjustment curve. It does not take time to learn the game's systems, but it is going to take some time to get used to how often the attacks miss.  Rather than sparking strategy, the cooldown system instead breeds frustration. To put it bluntly, battles are ugly. Each battle comes with a cluttered HUD, including giant controller symbols signifying when each skill is available. On top of that is the wonky lock-on system which leads to some terrible camera angles that caused far too many losses than they should. Which means a lot of the time, Heaven is unfair. Often times I found myself missing my opponent directly in front of me, and since each skill locks you in a single animation for some time, it gave them plenty of opportunity to do damage to me. And despite the game's attempts to balance this by incorporating RPG like skill trees, none of the skills have enough of an effect to warrant utilizing them. No matter how much you level up a character, they'll still do the same amount of damage per hit. And the computer opponent will always do more damage than you. recover their gauges faster, and you will always constantly struggle against the game's ugliness and poor design to completely catch up.  Playing through JoJo's Bizarre Adventure: Eyes of Heaven is a purgatory from which I could not escape. With no attention paid to non-single player modes, it is also a battle fought alone. With no support in sight, and with no reward for the struggle other than occasionally seeing your favorite character do something you like, there is little reason to stick through Eyes of Heaven even with its occasional bursts of personality.  JoJo's Bizarre Adventure may have had its eyes on heaven, but its soul is trapped in hell. [This review is based on a copy of the game provided by the publisher.]
Eyes of Heaven Review photo
Sighs of heaven
JoJo's Bizarre Adventure is the only property with such, well, bizarre characters, insanely disproportional art, backbreaking victory poses, operatic plot, and enough bravado to carry all of this on machismo alone. Thanks to ...

Code: HARDCORE photo
Code: HARDCORE

Feast your eyes on Code: HARDCORE's sweet robot sprite animations


Giant chest beams included
Jun 22
// Salvador G Rodiles
For a good while, I've been waiting for the day that someone would create an indie mecha title that was inspired by the Super Robot Wars series. While this day hasn't arrived, the Chinese Indie Game Development Team known as...

Review: Grand Kingdom

Jun 21 // Christian Chiok
[embed]35113:5710:0[/embed] Grand Kingdom (PS Vita [reviewed], PS4)Developer: Spike ChunsoftPublisher: NIS AmericaReleased: November 19th, 2015 (JP), June 17th, 2016 (EU), June 21st, 2016 (NA)MSRP: $49.99 (PS4), $39.99 (PS Vita) Unfortunately, the story is only about 12 story chapters each lasting at least 30 minutes to one hour.  On top of the short story, the game only gets interesting near the end.  It’s unfortunate since some of the characters are likeable as well as the voice acting work. Some of the characters reminded me of the typical ones found in Shonen series so I was really looking forward on seeing more of them. However, all the 36 chapters that were delivered as DLC in Japan are going to be included in the western release, giving you a total of 48 chapters of story from the get-go.  In the DLC chapters, you’ll have the chance to delve yourself in the story of each of the four Great Nations, allowing the player to align themselves with a particular nation and dig deeper into that nation’s motivations and history. Each campaign will introduce you to brand new characters, deeper ties that bind rulers to family and nation, and perhaps even discover something about yourself as you decide which nation tugs at your heart the most. The uniqueness of the gameplay styles with each mission taking place on a large game board in both you and enemies move around in, one turn at a time. Your team will be represented by a silver piece while the enemies’ will be represented by a purple and red piece, the latter being a stronger enemy. Additionally, the game board will have items lying around which can improve your journey. The concept may sound simple from first looks, but there’s a lot more to it. Depending on the mission, there will be a limit of how much you can move your piece, and reaching the limit results in an automatic failure. However, for the most part, you realize that you will have a lot more turns than that mission requires giving you room for mistakes and dawdling. You’ll also encounter invisible enemies in which you can only see their movement every three turns. Once you encounter the enemy, you will be taken to battle in a beautiful and crisp 2D art style similar to the Dragon’s Crown and Odin Sphere. In a way, you can say that the game is similar to Valkyria Chronicles, except in a side-on view with three rows for characters to stand on and move around in. Each turn, you will move your unit to a desired spot until your action gauge is emptied, then you can perform a skill, which can range from melee or ranged attacks as well as heal your comrades.  While on the hub and the quest map, you’re allowed to visit the Party menu in which you can form different formations. The game already has two default ones, however, both Offensive and Defensive in which you can modify.  You can also set shields or even medical boxes, which both are very helpful in battle.  Including DLC, which will be available to western players from the get-go, the game offers over 17 classes including Melee, Ranged, Magic, and Specialist units. You’re only allowed to hire a certain few classes in the beginning of the game but it’s enough to create a competent troop to beat the game. You’re allowed to make up to six troops consist of four units each. When hiring, you can customize your character ranging from their hairstyles, voices, colors, and starting stats. Melee units are characterized by their high attack and defense and specialize in close combat. They also have the ability to Guard, allowing the unit to negate all damage until their guard gauge depletes. Melee units have low magic defense, so it’s best to be careful when facing Magic units. Ranged units can attack from longer distances. With their extended attack range, they can reach enemies at the other side of the map. Unfortunately, Ranged units have low defense, so it's imperative that you place them in places where it’s hard for them engage in close combat or being hit by other Ranged units. Magic units have medium attack range, and use ranged attacks which allow the player to target multiple enemies. Some of their more powerful skills must be charged before they can be used, leaving them vulnerable to an enemy's ranged attack, in which results your attack being disrupted as well. Remember that the game has friendly fire so make sure that your units are out of the way as well. Unlike the Melee, Ranged, and Magic units, Specialist units lack a clearly defined role in battle. These units have individualized abilities that can be a great asset in battle, but their specialized nature affords little room for flexibility. They range from Medics, Challengers and Dragon Mage. Medics heal your units, Challenger places explosives and Dragon Mage allows the player to perform powerful melee attacks. One of my issues when using the Medic is that while angling where you want to throw your potion, it’s never accurate.  There will be times where you accidentally hit your unit with a poisonous potion or accidentally heal the opposing unit. While you’ll eventually adapt to the weird aiming, but this still proves to be a hindrance.   Aside from the story missions which usually consist of going from Point A to Point B, the game also features different side quests with variety of missions such as Stealth Missions and Guarding missions. In Stealth missions, you’ll navigate the world-map in a puzzle-like fashion to avoid encountering any enemies at all. As for the Guarding missions, you’ll be moving around the map to defend certain spots from incoming enemy assaults. Once the enemy reaches the spot, the missions fails. A big letdown with this game is that it doesn’t support cross-save so any progress that you made on the go with your PS Vita won’t be transferable to your PS4. It was a bit bothersome since when I got my hands on the PS4 version, I wanted to continue my journey on a bigger and better screen. At least the game allows cross-play support across both systems, expanding the amount of players you can play with in the online multiplayer modes.  Naturally the PS4 version is the superior version as it runs at 60 frames per second at 1080p. However, that doesn’t mean that the game is less enjoyable on PS Vita as it runs very smooth as well. If you’re looking to expand your Tactical JRPG library on PS Vita, I can definitely recommend Grand Kingdom.  Including the integrated DLC chapters, the game offers many hours of fun with more hours on top if you play the side missions. While the main story is short, it still features likeable characters making the journey worthwhile. With the PS Vita not getting many games lately, you can’t go wrong with Grand Kingdom. It’s an excellent addition on PS4 as well, though. 
Grand Kingdom photo
Fight For Your Grand Nation
Being a fan of the JRPGs, I always look forward to new additions to the genre, especially ones that offer a unique gameplay style that separates itself from other series. While not entirely unique, when first announced, Grand...

Yakuza 0 photo
Yakuza 0

Kick, punch, and crush ass through the '80s with Yakuza 0


Like A Dragon (in the '80s)
Jun 19
// Josh Tolentino
The Yakuza games may be an institution when it comes to high-profile Japanese gaming these days, but strangely enough, they've never portrayed Japan's gangster culture at its true height, during the boom years of the lat...
FFXV: Kingsglaive photo
FFXV: Kingsglaive

Here's your new look at the Kingsglaive: Final Fantasy XV CG movie


Advent...bodyguards?
Jun 17
// Josh Tolentino
Call me negative, but this hype campaign for Final Fantasy XV feels like it's getting a bit out of hand. I mean, look, the game is out in late September, and I'm sure it'll be fine but now we've got a new CG movie set to...
Persona 5 photo
Persona 5

Here's E3's good and bad news about Persona 5


Sorry, purists!
Jun 16
// Josh Tolentino
A lot of folks weren't expecting much Persona 5-related news out of E3, as these kinds of reveals are typically reserved for Japan-based events, but lo and behold, the company held an E3 demo stream of the game, showing off g...
Tales of Berseria photo
Tales of Berseria

Jam out to Tales of Berseria's fiery opening theme


This flame can't be put out
Jun 15
// Salvador G Rodiles
With E3 '16 still happening as we speak, Bandai Namco decided to show off a new trailer for Tales of Berseria that shows off the new opening theme by FLOW that's simply known as "Burn." From the looks of it, the song's ...
Gravity Rush 2 photo
Gravity Rush 2

Gravity Rush 2's trailer looks great, is criminally ignored


'2' is for the number of gravity girls
Jun 14
// Josh Tolentino
E3 is on a lot of folks' minds right now, and Sony has just held its press conference, where there was a stunning lack of Gravity Rush 2, despite the fact that a full trailer was ready and available for the taking.  Well...
Overwatch photo
Overwatch

Go full weeaboo with Overwatch's anime intros


Go further down this rabbit hole
Jun 13
// Josh Tolentino
Overwatch. It's all anyone can seem to talk about when it comes to hot new games, and with good reason: Blizzard's team shooter is kind of rad, and appeals to a lot of folks. Part of the reason for that is its deep bench...

Review: One Piece Burning Blood

Jun 07 // Christian Chiok
[embed]35078:5681:0[/embed] One Piece Burning Blood (PS4 (reviewed), PC, PS Vita & Xbox One)Developer: Spike ChunsoftPublisher: Bandai Namco EntertainmentReleased: April 21, 2016 (JP), May 31, 2016 (NA), June 3, 2016 (EU)MSRP:$59.99 (PS4, PC & Xbox One), $39.99 (PS Vita) When playing Anime fighting games, unless it’s Dragon Ball Z in which I already experienced the story mode so many times, I generally like playing through long hours of story mode. In One Piece Burning Blood, you’ll only play through the Marineford arc from four different perspectives — Luffy’s, Whitebeard’s, Akainu’s and Ace’s. It gave few hours of entertainment, especially since the cutscenes were great looking. I still think we could have gotten more than that, though. Aside from Story Mode, there’s also the Wanted Mode which allows players to hone their skills while taking on a series of wanted posters, earning yourself in-game currency which can be used to buy the remaining of the locked characters. The higher the bounty, the higher the reward you will get. While the mode is generally fun, the serious spikes of difficulty can be off putting. This was also an issue with Story Mode during the end. However after beating a difficulty fight, it definitely feels satisfying and you come out a better player. Like a good anime fighting game should, the game offers a Free Battle mode allowing players to fight against the computer or a friend. There’s also a Training Mode, giving the player various options like Opponent’s action as well as gauge levels. One of my favorite features is that the game lets you choose nine playable characters and three support characters. The only catch is that the game divides it into three teams (3 vs. 3), so once you lose the first round with the first set of three characters, then you’ll be allowed to use the second set of characters. You can also just do 1 vs. 1 battles. You will also be able to take the battle online, allowing you to play the usual Ranked and Player match types. From experience, the network is pretty solid so you’ll be able to play the game flawlessly with friends, the way it’s meant to be played. Although the story mode only covers the Marineford arc, most characters shown in recent arcs as well as popular characters from old arcs appear in the game, totaling over 40 playable characters and 65 support characters. My gripe with the support characters is that a lot of them should have been playable like Rob Lucci or Arlong. In top of that, support characters don’t appear on increase but give you battle effects such as restoring part of your HP or making your attacks a little stronger. In comparison with J-Stars Victory Versus, Spike Chunsoft’s previous anime fighter, I feel like this game is a lot better in terms of gameplay. The square and Triangle buttons are your main basic attacks which can also be used to create combos or even stronger attacks.  There are more in-depth features such as ranged attacks, special moves, guard-breaks, tag moves called Unity Assists and Breaks, and the powerful Awakened state, allowing you to perform your special attack as well. After three One Piece games with only the Original Japanese track, by now it shouldn’t be a surprised that Burning Blood only includes the original Japanese voices. Even with the Naruto English dub (the other languages too) not being caught up with the game, they were still able to get the game fully dubbed. While it’s really a shame, I think it’s something minor and shouldn’t dictate if you should skip the game. With the power of current gen consoles and PC, this game manages to be the most beautiful One Piece game up to date featuring cinematic cutscenes and amazing in-game graphics. My only gripe with the game is that it runs at 30 frames per second, with the upcoming PC version running at 30 fps as well. While the game still runs well at that frame rate, 60 frames per second could have definitely been better. If you’re like me who’s been wishing their One Piece fighting game fix for a while, Burning Blood definitely meets the criteria. While it lacks some essential playable characters, the game still offers a variety of good characters, both who are present in recent arts as well as popular ones.  
One Piece Burning Blood photo
Fighting To Be The Pirate King
Ever since the consistent video game releases of the Ultimate Ninja Storm series by CyberConnect2, the 3D Anime fighting game based on the popular Shonen Jump series Naruto, One Piece fans have been wishing that the series wo...

Persona 5 photo
See you in 8 months?
If you've been waiting on an English-language release date for Persona 5 before getting hyped up in anticipation, now is your time, waiting on the announcement of an English-language release date, are now at liberty to r...

Odin Sphere Leifthrasir photo
Odin Sphere Leifthrasir

Try out Odin Sphere's long-lost 8-bit ancestor


Or is it?!
Jun 06
// Josh Tolentino
I've always said that the games of Vanillaware feel like they came from an alternate history where 2D graphics continued to reign supreme instead of being supplanted by ever more realistic 3D tech. Now, with Odin Sphere Leift...

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