TV and Film

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New Japan Pro Wrestling

PSA: New Japan Pro Wrestling's data gets breached


18,000 customers' data on the ropes!
Jul 03
// Soul Tsukino
New Japan Pro Wrestling announced at a press conference today that the personal information of 18,000 customers has been leaked online by an unknown hacker. The data leaked includes customers' names, addresses, credit card in...
Ayakashi Zamurai photo
Ayakashi Zamurai

Garage Hero's Ayakashi Zamurai series unsheathes a new trailer


There's plenty of comedy to go around
Jul 03
// Salvador GRodiles
As Garage Hero continues to work hard on their upcoming projects, the group has taken the time to upload a new Ayakashi Zamurai trailer. This time around, we get to see more of the fantasy samurai show's comed...
Death Note photo
What, huh?
After the revelation of a Death Note TV series, pictures and actors being released, fans have been disgruntled by the faithfulness to the source material. Death Note is a manga turned anime and subsequently live action movies...


Strong Style: New Japan Pro Wrestling on AXS S2 episode 5

Jun 27 // Soul Tsukino
With that, here are the participants: [embed]34001:4875:0[/embed] A Block: Hiroshi Tanahashi (2007 winner) Satoshi Kojima (2010 winner) Yuji Nagata (2001 winner) Tomoaki Honma (Replacing an injured Kota Ibushi) Katsuyori Shibata Shinsuke Nakamura (2011 winner) Tomohiro Ishii Shelton X Benjamin Davey Boy Smith Jr Doc Gallows Bad Luck Fale B Block: Togi Makabe (2009 winner) Hirooki Goto (2008 winner) Tetsuya Naito (2013 winner) Hiroyoshi Tenzan (2006 2004 2003 winner) Kazuchika Okada (2012 winner) Toru Yano Minoru Suzuki Lance Archer AJ Styles Yujiro Takahashi  Karl Anderson So we begin on the first night of the tour at the Hokkaido Prefectural Sports Center on July 21 2014. Block A: Hiroshi Tanahashi vs. Tomoaki Honma: Interesting match with NJPW's big star taking on the perennial underdog. The announcers point out that Honma is replacing Ibushi who is out of the competition with a concussion. Honma gets a great reaction from the crowd. The picture being painted is that Honma may be the underdog, but he is hanging every step with Tanahashi. Honma actually dominates and sets up for his falling headbutt finisher, but as usual, he misses. Tanahashi hits a dragon suplex, but Honma kicks out. Honma nearly gets a pin with a roll up. Honma hangs tough, but Tanahashi hits the sling blade clothesline and a diving splash to get the win and two points. Brief, especially with the edits, but it got the point across. Block B: A.J. Styles vs. Kazuchika Okada: Really surprised this wasn't the feature match. Both "The Rainmaker" and "The Phenomenal One" have been featured on this show before so there isn't much new that I'll explain. Styles is the reigning IWGP Champion in this match as well, having beaten Okada. The crowd is FIRMLY behind Okada in this one. Styles is out here by himself while Okada has Gedo in his corner. Okada starts thing off with an awesome dropkick with Styles sitting on the top turnbuckle. They do an amazing spot where Styles is whipped into the ringside barricade, but leaps right over it into ringside, only to have Okada leap over and hit Styles. Further along in the match the ref is down. Okada goes for the win when Takahashi comes in as expected but gets dropkicked in the mouth for his troubles. They exchange moves including Okada hitting a tombstone out of a styles clash position before Okada decrapitates Styles with the rainmaker clothesline for the win and 2 big points. We get some words from Okada in the ring where he promises to beat Styles of the IWGP title and he will win the whole tournament. Gedo says pretty much the same thing. We get a few words from Shibata about his mindset going into this match. He talks about how he wondered what the fans would think of their match, and also how much Nakamura had changed since they were together 10 years ago. Block A: Shinsuke Nakamura vs. Katsuyori Shibata: The announcers do a great job of explaining how Shibata had left NJPW for over 7 years to go to MMA and various paces while his dojo classmates Nakamura and Tanahashi stayed. The difference in these two is night and day. Shibata  comes out in black tights and no flash. Very much like Dan Severn while Nakamura comes out with his usual flash and posing. The match starts tentatively as both men go for a classic style lock up.  Nakamura does some clowning, but Shibata makes him pay for it with some kicks. Seeing Shibata going for sit outs and lock ups shows he's had amateur wrestling training up the wazoo. Shibata puts Nakamura in a sleeper and then powers him over the top rope. Shibata's emotionless approach to calmly throwing Nakamura into the barricade and the ring posts is scary. Things slow down as Shibata goes for an early figure four leg lock. They break the hold and we go into Shibata smacking Nakamura around before Shinsuke gets fired up and takes over. The match is showing that while Shibata is the emotionless badass, Nakamura is every bit his equal and can fight as well. Shibata hits a sweet kick that knocks Shinsuke flat before Shibata hits a hanging dropkick (!). Nakamura goes for his finisher, but his met with a dropkick laying out both men as we go to a break. We come back as both men exchange forearms again and neither is going down. Nakamura hits two Boom-mae-yae knees to the skull, but Shibata gets up from the pin and then counters Shinsuke's charge with another dropkick. Shibata NAILS Shinsuke with a hell of a kick and gets the pin! Wow, not the result I would have guessed. Okay, now I see why this was made the feature! Nakamura gives us some words that his loss was a result of bad luck while Shibata doesn't really say much of anything. Badass? Yup. Promo man? Not even close. We get some studio words from Shibata saying he feels the match got a mixed reaction from fans (Huh? really?) but he's ready for more. As good a show is this is, watching it you can see the flaw of covering such a big tournament with just a 1-hour show. Each night is going to have 10 or 11 matches (and was 4 1/2 hours long), but really they could only show one full match and only clips of just two others. You miss some of the context here, but since it was only the first day of the tournament, Mauro and Josh didn't have to tell you about how many points each person had or what they had to do to stay in the race. Next week we shall see just how much of the rest of the tournament the announcers explain. I, on the other hand, don't have to worry about such things. Here is the quick results of the rest of night 1 and the points update. Block A: Fale beat Ishii, Benjamin beat Gallows, Kojima beat Nagata,  (Tanahashi/Shibata/Fale/Benjamin/Kojima all get 2 points) Block B: Tenzan beat Anderson, Yano beat Suzuki, Takahashi beat Naito, Goto beat Makabe (Okada/Tenzan/Yano/Takahashi/Goto all get 2 points) And there you have it. See you next week with more from the G1 Climax 24! With that here are the participants https://www.youtube.com/watch?t=101&v=EGCsYr4a-3Y A Block: Hiroshi Tanahashi (2007 winner) Satoshi Kojima (2010 winner) Yuji Nagata (2001 winner) Tomoaki Honma (Replacing an injured Kota Ibushi) Katsuyori Shibata Shinsuke Nakamura (2011 winner) Tomohiro Ishii Shelton X Benjamin Davey Boy Smith Jr Doc Gallows Bad Luck Fale B Block: Togi Makabe (2009 winner) Hirooki Goto (2008 winner) Tetsuya Naito (2013 winner) Hiroyoshi Tenzan (2006 2004 2003 winner) Kazuchika Okada (2012 winner) Toru Yano Minoru Suzuki Lance Archer AJ Styles Yujiro Takahashi  Karl Anderson So we begin on the first night of the tour at the Hokkaido Prefectural Sports Center Hiroshi Tanahashi vs. Tomoaki Honma Interesting match with NJPW's big star taking on the perennial underdog. A.J. Styles vs. Kazuchika Okada Really surprised this wasn't the feature match. Both "The Rainmaker" and "The Phenomenal One" have been featured on this show before so there isn't much new that I'll explain. Styles is the reigning IWGP Champion in this match as well. Shinsuke Nakamura vs. Katsuyori Shibata /ul/34001-/match2-620x.jpg [embed]34001:4864:0[/embed]
New Japan Pro Wrestling photo
The G1 Climax Begins!
Welcome back to Strong Style! This week we begin something very cool as NJPW on AXS TV begins its coverage of the 24th annual G1 Climax Tournament! The coverage of the tournament will take us all the way into August with high...

Love Live!! photo
Love Live!!

Love Live!! Movie US theater listings are here!


Your waifu idols hit the big screen
Jun 26
// Red Veron
Your favorite pop idol waifus from the anime Love Live!! μ's (pronounced 'Muse') arrive at theaters across the US this September and we now have dates for the showings. So what is Love Live!!? Love Live!! is mixed media fr...
Texas Toku Taisen photo
Texas Toku Taisen

Here's the Texas Toku Taisen '15's screening schedule for San Japan


Texas is about to get its Henshin on
Jun 24
// Salvador GRodiles
As we get ready to finish off the month of June, the screening schedule for this year's Texas Toku Taisen has hit the Web. This time around, they're showing their stuff at San Japan 8 on July 31 through Aug. 2, whic...
Cyborg 009 vs Devilman photo
Cyborg 009 vs Devilman

Aw snap: Cyborg 009 and Devilman collide in a new OVA


Sounds like a match made in heaven
Jun 19
// Salvador GRodiles
Oh wow, now this is what I call an unexpected turn of events. It turns out that the new Cyborg 009 anime is a three-episode crossover OVA with Devilman. Actas (Kotesushin Jeeg and MazinKaiser SKL's Animation P...

Strong Style: The Landscape of Japanese Pro Wrestling

Jun 19 // Soul Tsukino
  Japan Pro Wrestling Alliance (JWA):  Puroresu starts here. While many tours of pro wrestling were held in the post-war era, this is the first pro wrestling company to establish itself in Japan, starting in 1953. The JWA was the creation of a former sumo wrestler named Rikidozan (pictured above), who started wrestling a few years earlier.  The promotion was an instant hit as it became the first program shown live on Japanese TV with 3 days of wrestling shown on NHK and NTV. Later in the year Rikidozan became its first champion after shooting (going off the planned outcome) on judoka Masahiko Kimura and legitimately knocking him out. The JWA established many of the traditions of puro that are seen today such as multiple singles and tag team titles, holding annual tournaments, and bringing in foreign (Gaijin) talent to use on their shows. Sadly Rikidozan died in 1963 after being stabbed by a yakuza. After his death, the promotion had several internal struggles, mostly focused on who should replace Rikidozan as the company's top star. The JWA wanted to promote former baseball player, the 6'10" Shohei "Giant" Baba while some thought the top spot belonged to the faster and more technically sound Kanji "Antonio" Inoki. The two coexisted in the late 60s, but in 1972 the politics got so bad that both men left the JWA to start their own companies. The JWA struggled but ended up closing down in 1973 with all of its remaining talent going to either Baba's or Inoki's companies.   New Pro Wrestling (NJPW):  Started by Antonio Inoki in 1972, with him being the top star of the company. NJPW is the second biggest wrestling company in the world, behind WWE. Originally recognized the American NWF title as its top championship, they switched to the International Wrestling Gran Prix as its governing body in the 80's for all its titles. The company, along with Puroresu as a whole, hit a downturn in popularity in the late 1990s and early 2000's thanks to the rise of mixed martial arts, something Inoki was a trailblazer for with his shoot fights with Muhammad Ali, Willie Williams, and others in the 70's and 80's. Inoki didn't help puro's cause as he routinely sent wrestlers into one sided shoot fights against MMA stars and putting the IWGP title on people like Bob Sapp, Brock Lesnar, and Akebono. Inoki eventually stepped aside as head of the company to let his son-in-law Simon take over. Inoki sold the promotion to video game company Yukes before they sold it to current owner Bushiroad in 2012. Spearheaded by young new talent like Hiroshi Tanahashi, Okada, and Shinsuke Nakamura, NJPW was able to reverse its fortunes in the mid-2000's and grew to bigger heights. It has dominated the landscape in Japan ever since.   All Pro Wrestling (AJPW):  The company "Giant" Baba created in 1972. Was seen as more traditional of the post JWA companies and inherited all of the JWA's titles and a good number of its wrestlers, along with its membership in the American National Wrestling Alliance (NWA) when the JWA closed. With the NWA backing, AJPW held several world title matches with champions like Jack Brisco, Harley Race, and Ric Flair routinely stopping by, adding to the prestige of the company. Baba himself held the NWA World title 3 times, although his title reigns were usually very short, due to scheduling of the NWA title defenses. When the NWA dried up, Baba unified the companies singles titles (The PWF title, the NWA International Title, and the NWA United National title) to form the Triple Crown Championship in 1989. After Baba's death in 1999 from cancer, the company has had a major fall from prominence. Thanks to major talent defections in 2000 (led by top star and president Mitsuharu Misawa), and in 2012 (led by former president Kenji Mutoh), AJPW is a shell of its former self with only about 12 regularly contracted wrestlers. Though it still holds shows, the crowds are much smaller than NJPW's and rely heavily on freelance wrestlers.   Pro Wrestling NOAH:  The result of AJPW's second massive migration of talent in 2000 when president Mitsuharu Misawa quit, leading all but two native Japanese wrestlers away from All Japan to form a new company. The name is a reference to Noah's Ark. After taking big name wrestlers and securing All Japan's tv deal with Nippon TV, shot up to become a top player in overnight. It recognized the Global Honor Championship (GHC) as its main title. Sadly Misawa died in a tragic in-ring accident in 2009, and after some rough patches here and there, the company is still going strong. Although they could be considered the number 2 in right now, they don't mind lending out their talent either as NJPW's Minoru Suzuki and his group, Suzuki's Army, are actually based out of NOAH, including the Killer Elite Squad. Wrestle-1 (W1):  The result of top star and former company president Kenji Mutoh leading the third migration of talent from All Japan in 2012.  Although this promotion has done some promotional work with TNA/Impact Wrestling (resulting in the disastrous Bound For Glory show in 2014), it is still a smaller company that doesn't draw nearly the big crowds that New Japan does and is filled with wrestlers loyal to Mutoh, or students he is training.   Dramatic Dream Team (DDT):  Founded in 1997, DDT is an independent promotion that produces some wild antics that are a parody of WWE storylines. The most (in)famous aspect of this company is its Ironman Heavymetalweight Championship, a joke hardcore title that has been won by such title holders as two different dogs, a blow-up love doll, 3 different ladders and even the belt itself have been crowned champion. Outside the over the top stuff, it has produced some fine wrestlers including NJPW's Kota Ibushi.   Dragon Gate:  Originally this company started as Toryumon, based off Ultimo Dragon's training gym, but he left in 2003 for the WWE and took the name with him. Although they feature some heavyweights and some comedy characters, Dragon Gate's main bread and butter are smaller and faster style wrestlers, based off Ultimo Dragon's training in Mexico in the country's Lucha libre style. Several wrestlers from this group have wrestled in the United States for such companies as TNA, ROH, and Chikara and even has an American leg of the promotion, Dragon Gate, the uses top unsigned American talent. They also at one time had just about the coolest television opening in the world.   Freelance:  A concept that has grown in Japan, more so than in the Unites States, is freelance wrestlers. These are guys who are not signed to long-term deals with any one promotion in Japan and are able to go to any company they want. These folks are often used on big shows for companies, especially tournaments, or used to fill out shorthanded rosters. Even big promotions like New Japan use freelancers on their shows from time to time. There are other promotions in Japan, both past and present, but these are the major ones, especially in dealing with coverage of New Japan here on Japanator. The puroresu landscape is a large one with many different styles and approaches. There is something for every wrestling fan in Japan, so it's worth checking out. http://www.japanator.com/ul/33952-strong-style-the-landscape-of-japanese-pro-wrestling/NOAH-noscale.jpg
Strong Style photo
A broader look of Japanese Wrestling
Through the Strong Style coverage of New Japan Pro Wrestling on AXS TV, Japanator has given  a glimpse into the world of Japanese pro wrestling, or "puroresu", to its readers. Through the article, we've taken a look at s...

Strong Style: NJPW on AXS season 2 Episode 4

Jun 13 // Soul Tsukino
First and foremost though, I want to take this opportunity to pass along my thoughts and condolences of the passing of wrestling legend "American Dream" Dusty Rhodes. I grew up on Dusty, getting into wrestling just before he would appear in the WWF in his polka dots. I had read about him in the wrestling magazines of the day and that was when I got to see him in action. In 1990 I was ringside in the Augusta, Maine Civic Center to see him and Sapphire with Miss Elizabeth in their corner take on "Macho Man" Randy Savage and Queen Sherri Martel with Brother Love in their corner. Dusty was a big part of me enjoying wrestling since then, whether I realized it or not. He was a man unto himself not only in the ring or behind the mic, but backstage as well. Someone pointed out how ironic it was that the last big WWE show before he passed ended with a "Dusty Finish". It may not always garner the best reaction from fans, but it served as a great element to a story.  He was a great influence to the business and his legacy will live on with all of the young talent he influenced in NXT over the years.  So in tribute and to tie things together, here are some Dusty Rhodes classics with a bit of Nippon flare. Dusty V/S WWF Champion Bob Backlund from 1980 [embed]33945:4813:0[/embed] Dusty V/S Abdullah The Butcher from 1983 (WARNING: This is Bloody!) [embed]33945:4811:0[/embed] Dusty Rhodes: Cosplayer [embed]33945:4812:0[/embed] Tomoaki Honma & Yuji Nagata V/S  Hirooki Goto & Katsuyori Shibata: Little surprised they didn't show the Styles/Takahashi V/S Okada/Ishii match instead of this one, but that's how it goes. Nagata has been around since the 90's. WCW fans may remember his lower mid-card feud with Ultimo Dragon in the late 90s. He's a former IWGP champion and while he is still considered a top card wrestler, his best days are behind him, even if he holds Pro Wrestling Noah's top belt, the GHC Title. His partner Honma was mostly a hardcore death match style wrestler when he first started, but developed into a more well rounded wrestler in the late 2000's. He's popular with fans as an underdog hero. Goto is a wrestler who started in New Japan as a jr. heavyweight competitor who moved up to the heavyweight division. He is a midcard wrestler who has had brief brushes with main events, but never stayed there. His partner Shibata is actually a high school classmate of Goto's and also a second generation wrestler (His father was New Japan's Katsuhisa Shibata). He is also a trained MMA fighter with a 6 year run in K1 fighting.  Mauro and Josh welcome us again and Barnett points out that Goto and Shibata are the young guns in this match while their opponents are vets of the ring. Honma kicks things off literally as he and Shibata go back and forth. No feeling out process, strait to the heavy hits. Nagata and Honma take the early lead with stiff as hell strikes and kicks. Shibata BLASTS Honma in the face and pretty much knocks him motionless, but doesn't go for the pin and just brings in Goto instead. They switch back and forth on Honma and man Shibata is just MEAN. Did Honma owe him money or something? He's just punking Honma out here with kicks and strikes, but Honma fights back! Nagata finally geets the tag and HAULS OFF on Shibata with kicks. They get into a stand off with forearms with Nagata getting the advatage with a mafia kick. Nagata lands a exploder suplex but Shibata runs right up and counters with a olympic suplex. Goto tags in and gets right into an armbreaker before Yuji tags in Honma. Honma goes for his finsher, a falling top rope headbutt, but misses. Goto goes for the kill but Honma keeps fighting. All four start going at it.  Nagata and Shibata fight in the crowd as Goto scores the pin in the ring. However Nagata and Shibata just keep fighting into the back. Damn that match was wild! Bet all these guys were sore after that one. We get some words from Fale, in English no less! He talks about wanting to set himself as a big player in NJPW and wanting to destroy Nakamura over winning the belt.   Intercontinental Title: Shinsuke Nakamura V/S Bad Luck Fale: The challenger Bad Luck Fale (prounced Fah-Lay) Is the heavy of The Bullet Club. He tends to be more of a bodyguard than a wrestler, but here he is getting a title shot after nearly beating Nakamura in the New Japan Cup Tournament final. Coming from Tonga by way of New Zealand, he is a former rugby player who debuted in 2010. Nakamura is one of my favorites and someone who is a star for New Japan. He is an interesting sort. He has an artist-like way he wrestles his matches with weird movements and always seemingly looking at his opponent like a blank canvas to create art on. However, this man is a former MMA fighter and three time IWGP champion, so he's no pushover. When he won the IC title, he elevated the title to a main event status in New Japan so that shows just how good he is in the ring. Fale comes to the ring with Tama Tonga so expect cheating.  Nakamura comes to the ring dancing to his own beat as always. Josh and Mauro go into the hate that MMA got from fans going back into the late 90's when NJPW founder Antonio Inoki was having the pro wrestlers enter shoot fights and getting slaughtered. The bell rings and there is a lot of posturing before they lock up. Quickly the tale of this match is Fale being the much stronger of the two. Nakamura gets the edge by stomping on Fale's foot and kneeing him in the corner. Fale runs over Nakamura with a clothesline. This sends him out of the ring where Tama Tonga starts punching away. Fale takes Nakamura over the metal barrier. Mauro starts in on how the NJPW wrestlers are the best in the world, but the refs aren't so much. No respect for poor Red Shoes. He does have a point though. Nkamura gets in the ring as Fale dominates. After a mauling, Nakamura decides enough of that crap and mans up. Coming back from a break as both men are reeling.  Nakamura takes over with forearms and kicks. He misses a knee giving Fale an advantage but loses it just as quickly. Nakamura goes for a neckchoke but Fale counters with a suplex. Fale squashes Nakamura in the corner but doesn't get a pin. Fale goes for a Chokeslam/Asian spike combo (A move he calls The Grenade) but Nakamura kicks out of it and takes over. He gets Fale on the top rope and knees the heck out of him but Runs over Shinsuke with a clothesline. he goes for the Grenade but Shinsuke kicks out again. Fale goes to the top (!) but Nakamura gets him in a BIG superplex. Nakamura gets him in an over the shoulder suplex (good lord!) before Nakamura hits two Boom ba ye knees but gets speared when he goes for a third. Fale goes for a double chokeslam, but Nakamura counters with a head scissors, only to get dropped in a powerbomb. Fale then goes up and lands a huge splash, but Shinsuke kicks out! Fale hits the outsider edge and scores the pin! The Bullet Club celebrate in the ring as Nakamura is hauled out on a stretcher. We get some Bullet Club yammering before Fale closes us out with how important the match was to his career. That main event match was way better than it should have been. You'd think with a big inexperienced lug like Fale, they would have had a ton of outside interference and a ref bump, but nope, outside of one flurry of punches, the match was one on one. While Fale may not be a top card kind of guy, he showed me something here. Good show all around!
New Japan Pro Wrestling photo
Intercontinental Title on the line!
Welcome back to Strong Style! This week's show has AXS TV going back for our third episode of New Japan Pro Wrestling's Dominion 2014 event from Bodymaker Coliseum in Osaka. This week's show includes a heavy hitting tag match and an Intercontinental Title match.

Strong Style: New Japan Pro Wrestling on AXS season 2 episode 3

Jun 06 // Soul Tsukino
We start off this week's episode with a few words from Togi Makabe before we get to our first match. NWA Tag Team Title: Killer Elite Squad (Davey Boy Smith Jr./Lance Archer) V/S Ten-koji (Hiroshi Tenzan/Satoshi Kojima):  Smith and Archer both had mediocre runs in the WWE with Smith Jr. being a patsy for their wellness policy while Archer was a pick up from  TNA who had a minor push in the WWE's version of ECW. They both found much better success in Japan as part of the Suzuki Army, lead by Minoru Suzuki who we saw last week. Kojima and Tenzan have on and off teamed since 1999 when they were part of NWO Typhoon and later Team 2000. They are both former world champions and actually met in a match where both the IWGP title and Triple Crown Titles (the main title for competing wrestling company All Japan Pro Wrestling) were defended, making the winner, Kojima, the only man to hold both belts simultaneously. Also adding to this match is the title itself. The NWA (National Wrestling Alliace) was once the biggest organization in pro wrestling starting in 1948, So much so that the U.S.government nearly took them to court for operating as a monopoly. However, their clout pretty much died in 1986 when the territories it covered either were bought out or went broke. The name has been revived a few times, including WCW and New Japan in the early 90s and TNA in the first half of the 2000s, but after TNA gave up the name it really didn't mean anything anymore. In the last few years both NWA World and Tag titles are almost exclusively defended in Japan now as secondary titles. Mauro gives us some background on the NWA tag titles, pointing out the NWA didn't officially recognize tag titles until 1992 and the Miracle Violence Connection of Terry Gordy and Steve Williams. Chaos breaks out as all four men go at it. No feeling out process here as Tenzan and Smith smash each other. Kojima goes for his rapid fire corner chops and lays about 20 in on Archer. This is a no finesse match as  the hits just keep on coming. We come back from a break as Smith has the advantage over Kojima but Kojima fights his way back. Smith gets a chinlock in  as Mauro reminds us that Smith debuted as a wrestler at 10 years old (!) while Smith rips Kojima's breathe-right strip off. Tenzan comes in and swings the match for his team but Archer gets him down and goes up top for a MOONSAULT?! That is an impressive sight. Tenzan gets up from that though and keeps the match going. Kojima gives Smith the rapid chops and a diving elbow, but Smith gets up. Jeez, these hits are stiffer than a bottle of grain alcohol. The Squad hit the old Hart Attack move but Kojima kicks out again. Ten-koji goes for the Ten-koji cutter (the 3D) but Archer breaks up the pin. The Squad go for the Killer bomb (full nelson into powerbomb) but the count is broken again. Smith goes for a clothesline on Kojima, but Kojima ducks and smashes Smith was a Stan Hansen style clothesline and scores the win!   We get more words from Makabe as he explains that he is teaming with Tanahashi to represent NJPW against The Bullet Club. He also talks about wrestling with a broken jaw that he had suffered the month before. That's Japanese wrestling, just short of breaking your arm or leg like a twig, or your heads flies off in the second row, you wrestle! IWGP Tag Titles: Ace to King (Togi Makabe/Hiroshi Tanahashi) V/S The Bullet Club (Karl Anderson/Doc Gallows): Well this is an interesting match. Gallows and Anderson are the defending Champions. Gallows had roles in the WWE (Festus, Fake Kane, Luke Gallows) and TNA wrestling in the past. Anderson wrestled for mostly small indy feds before finding much better success in NJPW. They are also founding members of The Bullet Club along with Fergal Devitt (NXT's Finn Baylor). Tanahashi is basically New Japan's John Cena. He pretty much was the guy who helped resurrect NJPW in the early 2000's when pro wrestling's popularity was down thanks to MMA. He won the IWGP title several times and was a main feature of this show last season. His partner Makabe is known as "The Unchained Gorilla" and takes after the famed Bruiser Body in his wrestling, in other words he is a brawler who uses chairs and weapons a lot. Makabe isn't known for being a top card hero, so him teaming with Tanahashi does make for an odd combination. Hiroshi and Karl start things out as Hiroshi gets an edge and breaks out the air guitar. This match starts out more scientific than the opening match did. However, Gallows get his his shots from the outside early as well. Makabe comes in as the crowd cheers for him and the Club wants little to do with him. They have a stand off and Gallows hit him right in the JAW! Hiroshi comes in as Makabe decides to take a time out. Things break down with Makebe and Gallows on the outside and Karl and Hiroshi on the inside. Yeah, the landing didn't feel good for Tanahashi. The Club take advantage as both members of Ace to King as not in good shape. Hiroshi is getting beat on in the ring and while this is going on The club attacks Makabe at ringside. This has become a handicapped match as The Bullet Club have their way with Hiroshi. Hiroshi puts up a fight with forearms but isn't getting much in. Makabe gets back on the apron, mouth bleeding, before he comes in and goes to town on the Club. Crowd is solidly behind Makabe in this one. Makabe and Gallows face off with Togi getting the upper hand. The story of this match seems that whenever the challengers get the upper hand, the Club just shuts them down. Anderson hits an F-5 on Hiroshi but Tanahashi kicked out. Tanahashi nearly scores the win with a frog splash, but Anderson brings his knees up. We come back from break as Anderson gets the advantage. Makabe in but he gets kicked right to the jaw. He gets a powerbomb on Anderson but only gets a 2 count. Tanahashi scores a frog splash and Makabe goes for something of the top rope before Gallows whacks him with a chair. Makabe still kicks out. Tanahashi eats a Magic Killer from the Bullet Club and then they hit Makabe with the same move and keep Makabe down for a 3 count. Makabe gives us some final words about the fight as he talks about wrestling with a broken Jaw and teaming with Tanahashi as we are out. A nice change of pace from the high flying juniors we've seen the last few weeks, this was good ol' smash mouth tag team wrasslin'. All 4 teams manned up and didn't goof around n there. Ten-koji in the first match showed that they hadn't slowed down a bit over the years and in the second match I just kept cringing seeing all those hits to Togi's broken jaw. Once again a great presentation. Next week we get the third and final look at Dominion 2014!
New Japan Pro Wrestling photo
Tag Team Tussle!
New Japan Pro Wrestling on AXS brings us back to Bodymaker Stadium in Osaka for the second of three episodes looking at the Dominion card for June 21, 2014. This week we look at some tag team action from the heavyweight division. Two Titles are on the line and none of these teams are pushovers.

Strong Style: New Japan Pro Wrestling on AXS season 2 episode 2

May 30 // Soul Tsukino
We are at the Bodymaker Coliseum in Osaka for what is the first of 3 shows that are matches from the Dominion card from June 21, 2014. IWGP Jr. Tag Team Title: Time Splitters V/S Young Bucks: As was pointed out last week, the Time Splitters are Kushida and American Alex Shelley with a Back to the Future gimmick. The Young Bucks are brothers Matt and Nick Jackson, an American team that has been around the horn with runs in Ring of Honor as well as TNA. They have a bit of a reputation for thinking way to much of themselves and being dicks, but I think a lot of that is just hype. Here they are part of The Bullet Club, a bad guy stable that was started by Fergal Devitt (NXT'S Finn Baylor), before being lead by TNA and ROH stalwart A.J. Styles. Think the NWO with a little DX mixed in and that describes the Bullet Club, and no I don't say that as a compliment. The Bucks are the IWGP Jr. Tag team champions. The cocky champions come walking in with big smiles and threats of superkicks. This continues in the match with lots of crotch chops and "suck it" taunts. The story of his match is that the Splitters keep trying to keep the speed up while the Jacksons want to slow things down. The fun thing about Japanese wrestling is that you can hear what's going on in the ring and after a double chop to the chest, Nick Jackson screams "Oh my god!". The match is edited a bit for time but it's not taking too much away from the match. The team moves of the Spillters is a thing of beauty as they go on the attack but The Bucks counter with double moves of their own, especially the move they call "The Indytaker" where one man holds his opponent upside down while the other man dives off the rope, driving the opponent straight down on his head. The crowd is bonkers for this one as both teams go for finishers but the Splitters get the win when Kushida uses the "Hoverboard Lock" to get the submission and the titles. We get some words from the Splitters, actually Kushida does all the talking, in the post match press conference.   Takashi Iizuka & Minoru Suzuki V/S Toru Yano & Kazushi Sakuraba: The people in this match kinda scare me. On one side you have Suzuki (left bottom), an amateur wrestling champion and MMA pioneer who one of the founders of the Pancrase MMA promotion in 1993. He also is known as a an off kilter man who can basically destroy anyone, even as he has gotten older. His partner Iizuka (Top Left) is a grizzled veteran on NJPW (debuting in 1986) who isn't a walk in the park to wrestle either. On the other side you have Sakuraba (Bottom Right), an MMA master known as "The Gracie Killer" after having beaten 4 members of the famed Jujitsu master family. He is also a huge Otaku and known for his anime themed entrances to fights. He is partnered up with Yano (Top Right), a lot younger than the others in this match. He is a former amateur champion as well although like Iizuka, he is a brawler and heavy hitter. This match came about as Yano and Iizuka were partners in Team Chaos going against Suzuki's group of the Suzuki Army. Iizuka turned on Yano (a match shown last season on AXS). Sakuraba comes in as just a big name of MMA that could stand up to Suzuki. 3 of the 4 guys are around 50 years old, showing off another trait of Japanese wrestling where when guys get older, they start appearing in mid-card tag matches most often instead of main events and title matches (Wish companies in the States did that). Also, no beauty queens here for this one! Iizuka does the Bruiser Brody entrance through the crowd while Suzuki comes out with the towel over his head as a bad ass. Broadcaster Josh Barnett, it turns out, has had a hand in either training, or training with the people in this match, even teaming with Iizuka. Suzuki and Sakaraba, the MMA fighters start off in a classic grappling match before they just glare at each other and tag out to their partners. Things break down in a fight as a weird dynamic on the Yano/Sakuraba team develops with the wrestler Yano screaming orders as the MMA fighter Sakuraba, not always with success. This is a grudge match so lots of foreign objects are used like chairs, a hammer that rings the bell, a mic cord, and the tag rope are used, with the referee not disqualifying anyone. Sakuraba at one point tops Iizuka with palm strikes to the eye (ouch!) before Iizuka counters with a choke with a mic cord. After a spot where Yano and Suzuki fight over an exposed turnbuckle Yano gets clobbered with both a chair shot and and the "Iron Fist" of Iizuka (refer to the pic abovee of Iizuka), Suzuki hits a cradle piledriver on Yano to win the match for his team. The Army keep up the attack going after Sakuraba with the glove and piledriver as well. Suzuki gives us some words of how awesome he is to the press before we get to the main event of this show. IWGP Jr. Heavyweight Title: Kota Ibushi V/S Ricochet: As we saw last week Ricochet won the Best of the Super Juniors tournament to earn this title shot against Ibuchi. Kota Ibuchi is a long time Jr. Heavyweight with a Karate background. He hasn't had that big of an impact in the U.S. but had been featured on this show a few times in the first season. He also not only wrestles for New Japan, but also for the smaller Dramatic Dream Team (DDT) promotion as well. Ricochet's background was largely covered last week if you want to know more about him. We get some words from Ibushi before we get into the match as he talks about how much of an opponent Ricochet is after watching him in the BotSJ tournament. Both guys are "good guys" and for being under 220 pounds, neither are stick figures with muscles to spare. As the match starts the fans are solidly behind Ricochet surprisingly.  Both guys trade kicks to get things going but start up the action with a quick run of attempts for moves and the other guy flipping out of the way with cartwheels, moonsaults, and flips. No plodding here!  Ricochet gets an advantage with a move known as the Zig Zag (used by Dolph Ziggler) and goes to work over Ibushi with a mix of strikes and submission holds. Ibushi finally gets the advantage with a missile dropkick. He then dives outside the ring with a spring off the ropes and does a flip onto Ricochet nearly on the other side of the ring!  Richochet counters with his own missile drop kick that is a marvelous thing. Both men are back and forth on each other with the attacks getting bigger, turning the match into a game of 'Can you top this?'. Ibushi nearly kills himself when he falls off the top turnbuckle and hits himself in the face with the metal buckle. Ricochet gets him back up for a flying rana but Ricochet counters by doing a complete flip and landing on his feet! I'm loving this! Ibushi goes for a spinning phoenix splash (tribute to one of my favorites, Hayabusa) but misses, however Ricochet still can't get the pin. Ricochet goes for the Benedryller twice but Ibushi counters it. He hits a kick before going for the Phoenix Plex, a move I have never seen before in my life. He sets Ricochet for a powerbomb but when he gets him onto his shoulders, Ibushi grabs Ricochet's head and pulls in tight, before going backwards, looking like a tightly held version of the Kinnikuman Muscle Buster. Ibushi scores the pin with this one to retain the title to the roar of the crowd. Ricochet honors the winner by handing him the belt and the winner's trophy in the ring. We get words from both men after the match and then words from Ibushi praising Ricochet's resilience and power to end the show.  Holy crap, I had been told the main event match was incredible, and it was! My words aren't doing that match justice. The Middle tag match did provide a nice breather between the to Jr. Heavyweight matches and even that was kind of enjoyable in a kooky kind of way. The announcers were ON tonight as not only were they into the matches as much as the fans were, but Josh Barnett gets some credit with his experience with the men in the middle tag team match. This week once again, this show proves why it is a must watch for people who like really good wrestling instead of 25 minute promos and sketches involving fake Russians macking out on a guy like a horny school girl. See you all next week!
New Japan Pro Wrestling photo
Ibushi V/S Ricochet
[Welcome to Strong Style, Soul's new regular column covering the high-flying antics of Professional Wrestling in Glorious Nippon and beyond! - Josh] This week on New Japan Pro Wrestling on AXS TV we pick up from last wee...

Death Note photo
Death Note

Death Note TV series announced and characters revealed


More deaths than Game of Thrones
May 25
// Anthony Redgrave
Tsugumi Ohba's writing combined with Takeshi Obata's art produced a heart pounding, page turning manga called Death Note that was later adapted into a widely popular TV anime, a ho-hum movie adaptation, and some more side sto...

Strong Style: New Japan Pro Wrestling on AXS season 2 episode 1

May 24 // Soul Tsukino
We start the second season of New Japan Pro Wrestling on AXS TV the same way we left off, Mauro Ranallo and Josh Barnett are back with the play by play of the best action going on in Japan. As I have mentioned here before, This show is not a "first run" show like a Monday Night RAW or Smackdown. Instead it is a show that looks back at key matches and shows from recent NJPW history. This episode takes us to June 8th, 2014 and the Yoyogi National Gymnasium for the semi-finals and finals of the 2014 Best of the Super Juniors tournament. BotSJ is a tournament that was first held in 1988 and is a big spotlight on the lighter weight class in NJPW. Unlike "one and your done" style tournaments (IE: NCAA Basketball tournament), this competition is stet up much like Olympic Ice hockey where the 16 competitors are split into 2 groups. Each man fights all the other men in his bracket for points, the two top point-getters in each bracket face each other on this show with the winners of the semi-finals fighting for the trophy in the final. The show starts with one of our competitors tonight in Kushida. He shares his thoughts on competing that night before we get to our first match. Kushida vs. Taichi:  This is a very interesting match. Both men were trained in some part by 90's Japanese wrestling superstar "Dangerous K" Toshiaki Kawada. These two are also familiar to me from their runs 10 years ago in a promotion called HUSTLE that was so over the top it referred to itself as a "Fighting Opera" instead of wrestling. Taichi is a member of Team Chaos, a rule breaking stable in NJPW, and as Ranallo points out, a bit of an underdog to have gotten this far. Kushida is one half of a tag team called The Time Splitters.   A tag team who's gimmick is based off Back to the Future. Bless you Japan. Kushida also as noted is in this match as a replacement for his partner Alex Shelley who was injured. The match is a chaotic mess as Taichi attacked Shelly during his entrance with a chair and started a fight before the bell rings. This is like a fast paced cheating heel V/S good guy style match as both men have partners interfering on their behave and getting the referee to miss all of it. Taichi even pulls out a classic Eddie Geurrero spot where he tosses Kushida a cane, only to collapse in fake pain, making the ref think Kushida nailed him with it. The match comes to an end when Kushida unveils his new finisher, The "Hoverboard Lock", A flying kimura armlock. I'd have called it the McFlying armlock myself. The move gets the quick submission and sends Kushida to the finals.     Ryusuke Taguchi vs. Ricochet: Taguchi has popped up on this show before as one of NJPW's top Juniors,  He is the favorite of the tournament as he won the 2012 BotSJ and would have made the semifinals of the 2013 tournament but had to withdraw because of injury. Rochochet is an American wrestler with a large independent following, and here is representing the Dragon Gate promotion. Many will also know of his as Prince Puma, champion on the American Lucha Underground show. This match plays out with an opposite dynamic from the last match as both men are fan favorites and they play the match that way. It is very fast paced and it's a show of who can top who. There is a bit of a skip in the match, but it's not very big and you don't seem to miss much. Ricochet scores the win with his finisher, the Benedryller kick, to score the win. Both semis were kept short, under 8 minutes, as both winners would be coming back. These matches weren't hacked to death and were shown for the most part. As with last season Ranallo and Barnett do a great job of explaining to context of each guy as well as the tournament itself We get some more words from Kushida about his new finisher and about that night as well. Final: Kushida V/S Ricochet:  This match is amazing and feel like 3 different matches in one. The first part of the match is a slower paced mat wrestling match with hold, counter hold, escape, to get things kicked off. It switches to a million-miles-an-hour face-paced match where both men are keeping the pace up and landing several moves at once. Finally the match becomes a battle of attrition as each man is throwing out their biggest moves joined together with some hard kicks and elbows. The match is close to 40 minutes long, which to some American fans is unthinkable for Junior heavyweights. The story that is told during the entire match is Kushida keeps going for Ricochet's arm to set him up for the Hoverboard Lock, while Ricochet is wearing down Kushida for the Benedryller. To say they throw everything at each other is not an overstatement. These guys used every one of their biggest moves, and even some moves from other people to try to get the victory. The battle finally ends when Ricochet nails Kushida with a kick right to the head and then the Bendryller that folds Kushida in half before being pinned. During the entire match not only is the crowd very into the battle, but so are the announcers. No old timey vaudeville jokes, no bickering, no talks about women's underwear or whatever they pulled from the headlines to be topical for the week. Not only to both announcers put over the importance and history of the tournament, they put over the moves and action in the ring with more legitimacy than anything else going on in wrestling on TV. We get some post match words from Kushida who is sweating buckets and on the locker room floor before we get some in ring words from Ricochet, who challenges NJPW Junior Heavyweight Champion, Kota Ibushi, to a match (Ibushi accepts). We then get some in studio comments from Kushida where he talks about how the crowd was cheering for Ricochet in the finals and that putting on a good showing not only for himself, but Junior Heavyweights as a whole, was the goal of the match. Once again this show is my favorite. Josh Barnett and Marro Ranallo have not lost a thing since the first season  of shows and the producers put together a great 1 hour look at the show that night. The editing wasn't a hatchet job and a lot of the action was shown, while still having some comments from Kushida to get some insight into what one of the competitors was thinking during the course of the night. I encourage more people to watch this show and see what a wrestling show that takes itself more seriously can be like. Next Week we will see the match between Ricochet and Ibuchi for the title and feature the Time Splitters together in action going after the Jr. Heavyweight tag titles against the Young Bucks.
New Japan Pro Wrestling  photo
The best of Japan for American fans
Welcome to Strong Style, Japanator's look into Japanese wrestling! This time out we look at my favorite wrestling show on American TV as it returns for a second season. Can AXS keep up everything that made this show amazing during its first season? What does the producers pick to highlight from New Japan wrestling action? Take a read and find out!  

Bakuman photo
Bakuman

Live action screens from Bakuman movie


Manga on the big screen
May 18
// Anthony Redgrave
Movies based off anime/manga have faired much better than their geeky partner video games. The Death Note movie may have faltered a little due to the massive change in story but all the characters looked great and i...
Tokusou Sentai Dekaranger photo
Tokusou Sentai Dekaranger

It's Judgement Time: Dekaranger to return as a V-Cinema


Chu Chu Chu Deka Deka!
May 15
// Salvador GRodiles
Oh my. Right when it felt that Hurricanger was going to be the only Sentai show to get the 10 Years After treatment, a new beacon of hope has surfaced for toku fans. Seeing that it's been ten years since Tokusou Sentai Dekar...
Blow off photo
Blow off

AKB48 find out who is the best at blowing


Mmmmm cicada
May 13
// Hiroko Yamamura
Oshima Ryoka and Mogi Shinobu of AKB48  faced off during a new episode of AKBINGO! This time, it was their cheeks, lungs and taste for insects that was put to the test! Which gal was better at blowing! Who enjoys the crunch of flying protein?

Is New Japan Pro Wrestling the new WWE?

May 12 // Soul Tsukino
Since the closure of both Ted Turner's World Championship Wrestling and Paul Heyman's Extreme Championship Wrestling 15 years ago, TNA was viewed as the number 2 company, the "alternative" to the WWE. Started by Jeff Jarrett and his father Jerry in 2002 and having been run by Dixie Carter and her family for nearly as long, TNA strived to set itself apart from the WWE for years. Notable concepts like the 6 sided ring, the X division, and the various concept matches they have created over the years were an attempt to set themselves apart from what Vince was producing. But, try as they might, TNA never really made a dent. The company struggled to turn a profit since the beginning. They had some high profile departures within the last few years with long time cornerstone A.J. Styles leaving after TNA failed to agree to a new contract, along with stars like Chris Sabin, Frankie Kazarian, and Christopher Daniels. They lost their long time business partner in Spike TV and have settled on being aired on the much less carried Destination America channel, a move that has cost them up to 2/3rds of their regular audience they had beforehand. And although they have done some of their "special" events on Impact, their weekly show, they haven't aired a "live" pay per view show since last October (and that event itself was pre recorded from Japan). Impact Wrestling has lost a lot of its visibility among wrestling fans since the beginning of the year. In my mind it's no longer the number 2 company in the United States, and it's not really as big an alternative anymore. If this is the case, then someone would need to step up and becoming the true alternative to the WWE's megalith. And New Japan Pro Wrestling is fast on its way to becoming it. Granted, NJPW isn't there yet. However, They have many of the stones in place to build themselves to be. They've had their stars appear on shows for Ring of Honor. Sure, that isn't exactly headlining Wrestlemania, but it is a big start. Having Jeff Jarrett help bring over their biggest event of the year, WrestleKingdom, to American pay per view with Jim Ross doing English commentary was another huge step. If you are going to show off your wares, then show them the absolute best show you produce. Jim Ross, along with Matt Striker, explained the context of every match, the importance of every title, and the magnitude of the event for English speaking fans in a way that made for a great introduction to the product. Soon after NJPW made a big step in getting a weekly show on the AXS cable network. Although this wasn't a first run show like a Monday night RAW, it was a very well produced show highlighting the biggest matches of New Japan in the last few years. Host Mauro Ranallo and Josh Barnett blew me away with their commentary of these matches. They made the matches not only seem important, but they brought a level of credibility to the action more than anyone in the WWE or Impact have done in decades. The show did so well in its first season it has already been picked up for a second (That premieres at the end of May) But the biggest thing going for NJPW that makes it a big alternative to the WWE is that it too has an online archive that rivals the WWE Network. This past January when #CancelWWEnetwork was trending on Twitter after the disaster that was their Royal Rumble event, who was the first to step up and tell people to spend their money on their service? NJPW.  NJPW World obviously isn't for everyone, but there is a sizable portion of wrestling fans that are increasingly cynical and resentful of what the WWE has done in their corporate atmosphere. With American exposure, a weekly TV show to gives a informed spotlight to the action and its stars, and a 24/7 archive streaming service that isn't beaten over your head every two seconds, what's left for NJPW to become a true alternative? A first run show, even if it is on a slight delay, would probably ideal, but that might be a while off. Having AXS carry entire  NJPW special events might be closer to achievable.   AXS does very well with its live MMA coverage and bringing that to NJPW wouldn't be that much of a transition. Also, carrying events on tape delay would bring in a sizable audience as well. Some well-placed ads on the USA network during RAW or other similar types of programming and you have a bigger audience than what currently follows the product.  Unlike Impact or Ring of Honor, NJPW has the funds and the influence to make things like this happen. So with NJPW, the sky's the limit as to what else they can bring to American shores. They already have a great foundation, now is the time to build on it and give the WWE something to think about. WWE has grown complacent since there is no real threat to them here. Vince, and by extension the WWE, thrive better in a competitive atmosphere.  Any kind of challenge a big player like NJPW can bring would make the WWE stand up, take attention, and bring out the best in them as well. The past has shown us that when the WWE is on their game, the entire industry benefits. And right now, it sure could use it. NJPW brought back popularity of pro wrestling in Japan a decade ago, it's time for them to bring it to new heights in the U.S. and give the WWE a run for its money.  
New Japan Pro Wrestling photo
NJPW's presence in the U.S. grows
Being a fan of professional wrestling in the United States, you've got choices. Of course there is the biggest game in town in Vince McMahon's WWE, who have dominated the market practically  unopposed since 2001. Behind ...

Fan Expo Dallas photo
Fan Expo Dallas

Heading to Fan Expo Dallas? Come have dinner with Godzilla's staff


Be sure to have a roaring appetite
May 10
// Salvador GRodiles
You know. Meeting your favorite industry people at a convention may be cool and all, but nothing beats the idea of having a meal with the folks you admire. Speaking of which, Fan Expo Dallas' giving people the chance to ...
Anime Expo '15 photo
Anime Expo '15

Sweet: LeSean Thomas and Thomas Romain to appear at AX '15


Double Thomas Xtreme!
May 09
// Salvador GRodiles
As LeSean Thomas (Black Dynamite: The Animated Series Season 1 and 2's Supervising Director, Legend of Korra Book 1's Production Artist) and his team continue to work hard on Cannon Busters' pilot, the guy's appearing at...
Digimon photo
Digimon

Digimon Adventure tri.'s latest trailer will please your nostalgic heart


The Crest of Hope shines strong
May 07
// Salvador GRodiles
This might sound strange, but I have yet to watch Digimon Adventure in its original language. Nonetheless, the series is still one of those titles that I still adore to this day. Anyway, Toei's uploaded a new trail...
Ayakashi Zamurai photo
Ayakashi Zamurai

Check out Garage Hero's Ayakashi Zamurai teaser


Sounds like a sword-clashing good time
Apr 27
// Salvador GRodiles
Garage Hero's Hayate web series may have been put on hold, but their latest project, Ayakashi Zamurai, has received its first teaser. Based on the trailer's content, it looks like the group's hitting us with another fun proj...
Love Live! photo
Love Live!

Love Live Movie goes international in new trailer


From the East coast to every coast!
Apr 24
// Red Veron
We finally get a new trailer for the upcoming Love Live! School Idol MOVIE, which is a feature length film featuring the next (and final) adventure of the franchise's lead idol group, μ's. Love Live! is this crazy multimedia franchise that has garnered quite a following around the world with the music, anime, merchandise, and that really fun music rhythm game on mobile devices.
Cannon Busters photo
Cannon Busters

Rejoice: Cannon Busters' production has begun


It's time to get excited
Apr 07
// Salvador GRodiles
Good news, everyone; LeSean Thomas and his crew are ready to start working on Cannon Busters, the adventure series with a teen and older audience in mind. After going through a process of planning the production, the team is ...
Garage Hero photo
Garage Hero

Aw snap, Garage Hero share their thoughts on the Ultraman Ginga S movie


Brought to you by Whey Body Protein
Mar 27
// Salvador GRodiles
If you've been interested in checking out Ultraman Ginga S the Movie: Showdown! The 10 Ultra Warriors, Bueno (Gun Caliber's Director, Producer, and Hero), Michael (Gun Caliber's Blue), Max (Hayate's Co-Producer) an...

Review: Naruto: The Last

Mar 21 // Red Veron
Naruto: The LastStudio: Studio PierrotLicensed by: Eleven ArtsReleased: February 20, 2015 (North American Theatrical)Naruto: The Last offers up a chance to see a little bit of what happens in the penultimate chapter of the Naruto manga. It’s been two years since the end of the war and peace reigns throughout the ninja nations until the world notices that the moon is coming dangerously closer to the earth with moon rocks breaking off as meteorites fall to earth. Things get worse when a mysterious figure who claims to be responsible for the lunar lunacy kidnaps Hinata Hyuga’s little sister, Hanabi. Now Hinata and Naruto along with Sakura, Shikamaru, and Sai go off to save Hanabi and the world. If you’ve been paying attention to all the trailers and the last chapter of Naruto, you may know that this movie features Naruto and Hinata finally getting together as a couple.  Don’t go expecting full love story with a style similar to that of a shoujo romance. It gets the job done; it’s the catalyst that finally gets Naruto and Hinata together though we don’t get to see them as an “official” couple. It’s similar to how shounen action handles romance though instead of being a thing that breaks up the action, but here it’s part of what gets the plot going in Naruto: The Last. The movie does get a chance to show a little bit of Naruto and Hinata’s budding romance. It is very refreshing to see characters from something so focused on action like the shounen genre in a different light, I’ve always loved seeing art of characters being in a different setting. For a few minutes in the movie, Hinata gets to be a normal teen girl dealing with love problems and Naruto gets to be a clueless harem protagonist that just doesn’t get it. I have to admit I enjoyed that part and it helped my enjoyment of the movie so much more. If you’ve been keeping up with the Naruto manga, you may have seen that Naruto is super powerful towards the end of the manga and would probably crush anyone who starts up trouble. The new baddie in this movie is a crafty one, and a 114 minute movie doesn’t have the same luxury of the anime and manga that can show off that the bad guy is more capable than the protagonists in multiple chapters or episodes. This power difference scale thing can be a bit distracting when you see someone skilled in fighting like Hinata Hyuga be somewhat relegated to a damsel-in-distress role. I can forgive that since there are reasons for such a thing and that it actually gets Naruto to think of her as more than a ninja buddy. There has to be some sense of urgency and a challenge for our protagonists to get the movie going. As for how the movie looks, it looks great. Fluid and clean animation pumps up the action in the fight scenes. It’s great to see the Naruto cast in action showing off their special moves and techniques in a much better  looking quality than the anime, especially that this is “The Last” one.  It’s not just the action that looks great, there are very visually pleasing sequences in the movie. I liked the intro sequence that gives a brief look into Naruto history; it’s well done though a bit weird when you realize the choice for the background song. There’s another sequence in the movie that gets a bit surreal that is a nice treat for those that have seen all of the Naruto anime. Those ending credits are just so pretty. If you’ve seen the trailer then a lot of you may be excited that certain characters that you love will show up again. Some of you may be disappointed that not everyone is going get much screen time, if at all. We do get a chance to see a few of other characters dealing with the impending threat of the moon crashing to Earth while Naruto and company are on their rescue mission, which is a nice treat for longtime fans. So should you go see Naruto: the Last? It’s a must-see for diehard Naruto fans that need to see more of the character Naruto before he grows up into an adult in that last manga chapter. It shows off a different side of Naruto and Hinata and how they grow beyond more than just being fighters. If you like Hinata and Naruto, you’ll like this movie and you’re going to get to see a lot of them here since this movie is about them after all. I loved how this movie shows a protagonist that finally gets romantically together with another character, since you hardly see that in the shounen action genre. I have to admit that I got something in my eye as I watched the ending credits that had beautiful art of the characters with that very sweet accompanying song just got to me. This movie is a great farewell for Naruto, to his action packed adventures as a teenager and a great beginning to his path to adulthood achieving his dream to becoming the Hokage. 7.0 – Good. Films or shows that get this score are good, but not great. These could have been destined for greatness, but were held back by their flaws. While some may not enjoy them, fans of the genre will definitely love them.
Naruto: The Last photo
Going off with a blast
Naruto is a name known throughout the anime and manga world that stands alongside shounen action staples such as Dragon Ball and Bleach. Masashi Kishimoto’s orange-clad ninja has been around since 1999 and has grown ...

Attack on Titan photo
Attack on Titan

Attack on Titan live action movie footage is here


In the flesh
Mar 19
// Red Veron
The good stuff starts at the 0:57 second mark. Get hyped.
Gun Caliber photo
Gun Caliber

Gun Caliber: Bootleg Edition shoots its way back to YouTube


Spring is about to get filled with bullets
Mar 14
// Salvador GRodiles
Spring may be known as that the Season of Allergies, but Bueno and Garage Hero have decided to overcome this issue with their fourth YouTube stream of Gun Caliber: Bootleg Edition. This time around, people can watch...
Beyond The Boundary photo
Beyond The Boundary

Check out the new Beyond the Boundary movie trailers and premiere bonus items


Revisit the Past, See the Future
Mar 07
// Red Veron
Back in 2013, Beyond the Boundary proved that Kyoto Animation can do still do action anime since it's been a while since their last attempt with Full Metal Panic: The Second Raid. I loved it and wanted much more of this actio...
Gundam: The Origin photo
Gundam: The Origin

Watch 7 minutes of the Red Comet in Gundam: The Origin


Watch the veritable Red Comet in action!
Feb 17
// Red Veron
Fans of the Red Comet, rejoice! We finally get to see Char Aznable in action in this new trailer for the upcoming first part of the OVA adaptation of Mobile Suit Gundam: The Origin. The trailer features Char Aznable laying wa...

We Chat With Gun Caliber's Bueno: Toys, Choreography, and Toku's current state

Feb 16 // Salvador GRodiles
Japanator: If you were given the chance to work on any existing tokusatsu franchise, which one would you do, and how would you make it different? Bueno: I'd make Mirai Ninja, because Keita Amemiya has been talking about making that, ever since he made the first one-- and he hasn't done it. Because all that Pachinko money is funding the Garo shows, so he's stuck in this endless loop where he has to make Garo shows, because the Pachinko games are making the money to fund them. Japanator: Oh! So that's why there's been so many Garo projects lately. Bueno: Yeah. Nobody really understands that. Have you heard my podcast with Mecha Gorilla? Japanator: Yes! Bueno: We talked about the same thing-- I think it was with Mecha Gorilla or Christafurion and Friends. The Pachinko games pretty much fund the series. That's why they have so much series of Garo. Then, it's an endless loop of, "Okay, Garo had a Pachinko game that did well, so it funds the new Garo series." Then the new Garo series gets a Pachinko game based on it, and that one funds the next one. So he's kind of stuck in that rut, and I want to be able to work with Keita Amemiya on Mirai Ninja 2. But I don't know, that brings me to another discussion of if I would want to work on a Japanese production. From my experiences here in Japan, working on somebody else's projects --especially the Japanese ones-- could be really really really tough work, because there's a certain way of doing things. Also, because of the fact that you are a foreigner, working in this industry over here, you're gonna deal with a lot of racism. Bueno with Mark Musashi (Sh15uya's Piece, Garo's Kodama) at Machigaine Hot Dogs in Akihabara Japanator: Based on your experience with tokusatsu and film making, what are your current thoughts on the tokusatsu industry? Bueno: More than the industry, the "fandom" is kind of in a rut right now. The four major franchises in tokusatsu right now are Kamen Rider, Super Sentai, Ultraman, and Garo-- as far as like henshin hero stuff goes. People would say Godzilla and kaiju stuff, but when people say "tokusatsu," they're going to talk about Kamen Rider more-- you just gotta face the facts. That's partially the reason why SciFi Japan TV closed down, they had some great content, but nobody gave a shit. They wanted to cover Ultraman and kaiju stuff, and not the Kamen Rider and Super Sentai stuff , because that's what Tokusatsu Network and HJU cover. They wanted to break from the mold. The problem with that is that the fans like to talk about Kamen Rider and Super Sentai more than Ultraman and kaiju, so they don't know who their audience is. The fandom of Ultraman and Godzilla is very small, compared to Kamen Rider and Super Sentai. That leads me to the gripe that I have with tokusatsu right now: The "fandom" consists of consumers, and not enough creators. When I say this, I'm talking about the "fandom," and the fact that they like to talk tokusatsu, rather than try to create it. There's a number of reasons of why this is: "Fans" see it as intimidating, they think it cost too much, they don't have the know-how, or they don't have the time. There's tons of excuses, and sometimes they are good excuses, like it really does cost money. There are "some toku fans" out there who basically say, "Yeah, I could do that, I could do this." I don't know if you remember Carey Martell, but he's a guy who was so full of himself, and he wanted to make an American tokusatsu called Deathfist Ninja GKaiser. He made the effort, but nobody wanted to help him fund the movie. Bueno with Japanese comedian Kaori Takamura at YouTube Space Tokyo Me on the other hand, I just decided to go out there, and stop waiting. I got off my ass, and worked at my job to raise the money to make a tokusatsu. That's pretty much what it is, you gotta to raise the funds til you have the suit. The first step is getting the suit, but "certain toku fans" don't realize that, because they're thinking, "Oh, it cost too much money." That's why a lot of people don't have the resources to make tokusatsu, and that's probably why they only relegate themselves to reviewing or gossiping about tokusatsu, rather than making it. It's sad, because the fandom consists of that, and only that right now. To me, the people out there who're struggling to make their own tokusatsu are the super die-hard fans, because they're inspired by tokusatsu to make tokusatsu that they feel is the kind of tokusatsu that they want to watch. Then there are "certain toku fans" out there who just bicker about that and talk about like, "Oh, well I could make a better tokusatsu." I ask them "Then why don't you?" They go like, "Oh, well I don't have the money, or I don't have the time." It's excuses after excuses after excuses, and that's what really pisses me off about the "fandom." They'll talk about Kamen Rider and all that stuff, but when somebody makes more effort to make something different, it doesn't get recognized. That's why whenever I see somebody making an independent production, I'm like, "Okay, I'm gonna bookmark this video." It's gonna be the same thing every year: There's gonna be a new Rider, a new Sentai, a new Ultraman, and a new Garo. That's it, it's only those four. In the '80s and '90s, there was an explosion of tokusatsu where there were lots of different ones. With the way the economy is right now, there's not enough money being put into entertainment, so there's only a few brands. Japanator: A few years ago, you and most of Garage Hero's members reviewed the Super Hero Wars movies. That said, how bad do you think Super Hero Wars GP is going to be? Bueno: Yonemura's writing it, so I don't think it's going to be all that good. Again, this is one of the things that I was talking about right here. Rather than talking about original tokusatsu, here we are talking about Kamen Rider and Toei. This is what the "fandom" has gone down to-- they have to talk about how good or bad something is, rather than doing something about it. That's what's kind of bothering me about the whole thing with tokusatsu and "tokusatsu fandom." That's why I want to do something about it-- that's why I'm making original content and that's why I'm making the kind of toku that I want to make. Because Super Hero Taisen was shitty, that made me even more motivated to make my own tokusatsu, and that's the kind of mindset that people got to get into. Rather than bitching about something at home in front of a computer, they got to get out of the house; buy some tools, buy all the resources they need, and start making their own tokusatsu. They don't have to, but if there's a lot of people saying, "I could do a better job," they should really step up to the plate and prove it. This is for all the "fanboys:" Shirakura, who is originally the Producer of Agito and Ryuki, is the owner of Toei now. He runs the company, and officially does not give a shit about anything the fans think about Kamen Rider-- that's how jaded he is. That's why Super Hero Taisen was made. He had this brainchild of, "Oh, if I slap Kamen Rider and Super Sentai on it, then people are going to like it-- even if it's a shitty movie." So he hired Yonemura to write this really shitty script, and what happened? It was a shitty movie, but the fans ate it up. All of the interviews that they have went like, "Aw, it was great to see all of the heroes on screen," but they're not going to talk about how shitty the movie is, because that's how Japanese culture is. They do not talk straight like that; they want to be polite. I remember watching Super Hero Taisen Z with Fernando, Daryl, and all them in the movie theater. Then there was this kid right beside me, and I was like, "Hey, you like Kamen Rider and Super Sentai?" He was like, "Yeah." The mom's all like, "We actually got tickets from the Producer, Shirakura." I thought to myself, "Well, it's too bad they're not refundable." They watched the movie, and then the kid was bored out of his mind. He was twisting and turning in his seat, and the mom was like, "For God's sake, sit straight." Then he yawned like five times during some scenes, and I watched carefully. When the movie was over, guess what the kid said. Japanator: He hated the movie? Bueno: No, he said, "That was awesome!" Japanator: WHAT?! Bueno: See, this is what I'm talking about. It's fucking brainwashing, man. All these kids are being brainwashed into thinking, "because there's all these superheroes on screen, it's gonna be good," and it's not. Even though they subconsciously know, and their body tells them, "This movie is shit," they're brainwashed into saying, "That was awesome." This is why tokusatsu sucks right now. Shirakura only cares about two things: Selling toys, so he can get his Bandai check, and selling tickets, so he can get his Toei check. That's his way of thinking in a business. Japanator: So when did Shirakura become Toei's owner? Bueno: I don't know; I don't care. Bueno with Koichi Sakamoto at an Aka x Pink promotional event Okay, here's the two ways of thinking in tokusatsu business: You have Shirakura who's like, "If I put Kamen Rider on it, I could sell toys. If I put Sentai on it, I could sell toys and make money." Then you have the Sakamoto way of thinking where it's like, "I can shoot some cool action utilizing the toys in a way that'll get people to want to buy it, and that'll sell toys." Guess what? That works! With W, OOO, Fourze, and Wizard even, he uses the toys, and it sells. Plus, it has a cool action scene, so it sells the DVDs and tickets. I watched the Fourze movie three times, and it works. At the end of it all, Sakamoto is like a big kid, so he understands what the kids like. The Twelve Horoscopes fight scene from the Fourze movie is probably the best tokusatsu fight scene to date, because a.) it sells the toy, b.) it's a cool fight scene, and c.) each time he uses the toy, it has meaning. I highly recommended movie for anybody who wants to know how to shoot a good tokusatsu fight scene or movie. There's that certain group of tokusatsu fans who're like, "It's all about the toys; I don't like it! It should be about the suits and the story." Little do they know, if you don't have the toys, how are you supposed to make tokusatsu? They'll be like, "Well, there's Godzilla." Godzilla's fandom is fairly big because of the fact it was the first one. But if you want something like Kamen Rider, how are you going to make a decent fight scene without any toys? Basically, if people want Kamen Rider to not be based on the toys, that means that you gotta take away the henshin belt and the suit. If you take away the belt, you have no suit and no Rider, so all of these fans are contradicting themselves. When you take a look at the action in Gun Caliber, what do you see? Japanator: I see that he has a henshin device that's a phone, a pair of guns, and a suit. Bueno: What's the main thing about the guns? Japanator: They can switch through different types of bullets. Bueno: Exactly! Why do you think that they have all of these accessories with Kamen Rider belts? Japanator: Merchandising. Bueno: It's not only merchandising, but it also helps with the action. When you have Gaia Memories that are able to have different attributes to both sides of Double, that switches the action. In the fight scene in the Fourze movie when he uses all 40 Switches, he uses them to counterattack each of the Horoscopes. Now you take a look at the Wizard movie, he failed to do all this. Sakamoto wasn't part of it, it was Ishigaki, he's an Action Director at Toei-- he's been doing stuff ever since Exceedraft. Visually, he's a good Action Director, but as far as concepts go, he's not a good Action Choreographer. He tried to do the Sakamoto thing with the Wizard movie, but it didn't work out. Most likely because you need time to choreograph something like that, and it was something he probably didn't have. To be able to choreograph a good fight scene, it's not just filming the suits and action anymore, it's being able to utilize the props and the character itself. That's the key to making a good tokusatsu fight scene. Japanator: Do you think that your work could inspire others to create their own toku projects? Bueno: Yeah, I hope so. I'm not saying that Gun Caliber is some sort of game changer, but Gun Caliber is the first independently funded tokusatsu film to be shot entirely in Tokyo, Japan; starring, directed, and produced by foreigner. If there's any other movies that could say "they've done that," go ahead. Show me who's done that, and I'll shut up. As far as I know, nobody's done that here. Nobody's had the balls to do it, and I have the balls! Japanator: Aside from tokusatsu and over-the-top productions like Gun Caliber, Hayate, and Yakuzambie, what other types of mediums does Garage Hero plan to tackle in the future? Bueno: We wanna do more stuff like tutorials, because the tokusatsu community right now consists of a lot of people talking about tokusatsu, and not making tokusatsu, You have a lot of people who write fanfics, short stories, or they'll create their own manga. The fact of the matter is that they really really want to make a tokusatsu, like a henshin hero and stuff like that. When they're faced with the dilemma of "Oh, I don't know how," "It cost too much money," or "There's no tutorial," that's where we hope to come in. We're going to make a tutorial series that's going to give people the basic know-how to make to make tokusatsu-- just like how we did. We didn't know what the hell we were doing, but we went on and did it. Then it worked, people like it. It took a long time, and a lot of resources and self study to be able shoot that thing. It took two years to shoot it, but the fact of the matter is that it all boils down to having the guts to do it. For a lot of people, they seem to lack the courage to shoot something like this-- even if it's just a short, because they have to worry about scheduling, paying for people's transportation, and food. That's the kind of things that people don't see behind the scenes-- you gotta do all that stuff. I think when people learn, "Okay, you need to do this and this, but you can add a little bit of you own flavor to it," that's when it becomes a little more interactive, and people want to give it a try. They won't be so intimidated. Right now, if you take a look at YouTube videos of learning how to sculpt a clay head or helmet, it's really intimidating, because the guy's really good. With our video series, we hope to be able to explain techniques, and how to make tokusatsu in the span of a five-minute video that gets straight to the point of what tools you need, what you should do, what to do afterwards, and some shorts to go with that. For example, I have a two/one-minute Gun Caliber action short, and then we focus on his mask or helmet, and then we'll have a tutorial video explaining"Okay, this is how the helmet is made."  I'm planning to produce another series with a person named Max Ellis, so we're hoping to produce more stuff this year for Garage Hero, and more web series. Since everybody automatically thinks that if you say "Bueno," it equals action, I'm planning this series that's in the style of a fighting game. It's gonna be a one-minute, or two-minute fight scene maybe at the most-- even just 30 seconds of two people duking it out fighting game style. It'll just be a bunch of zany stereotypical fighting game characters, and they'll have finishers. It'll be a fun series that'll help us get those creative juices flowing-- aside from just shooting tokusatsu. It'll be a little different, but still in familiar grounds.  Japanator: Speaking of tokusatsu tutorials, do you plan to cover any other aspects outside of making costumes and props? Bueno: Of course. With tokusatsu, there's a lot of areas to cover. For example, cinematography (like how to shoot a tokusatsu fight scene), there's certain techniques that they used from all the way back in the '60s, '70s, and '80s. During those times, they had a bunch of shooting techniques to make people look like they are jumping higher than they are, to make people look like they're kicking high in the air when they're really just a few feet off the ground, and to make monsters look bigger. They didn't have CG, but they made them look huge, and the people look small. It's a matter of being able to how to use your camera, your lens, and how to edit-- also cinematography. We're gonna cover a lot of those aspects as well.  A lot of people are just all like, "Oh. Are you going to teach fight choreography?" Everybody's going to choreograph differently, but we could teach the basics. I'm not making their heroes, so only they're going to know how to choreograph the action for their hero. More than choreography, we're going to focus on the cinematography, and how to Action Direct, and not how to Action Choreograph. We plan to teach CG as well, and the different types of tokusatsu shoots. You have the kaiju shoot, the hero action, and all that stuff, so we'll definitely cover all that.  Bueno with Freddy Wong at YouTube Space Tokyo Japanator: Could you tell us about your process in how you improved in creating tokusatsu hero and monster suits? Bueno: Well, you got to remember Gun Caliber was my first attempt, and I'm still in the learning process. I'm still learning stuff from people, and trying stuff out while buying new materials-- and see what works for decent prices. It's all a lot trial and error. In terms of getting better, you just gotta do it. With tokusatsu, you just have to jump into it-- that's the best way. Do a little bit of research, but jump into things. If you mess up, don't worry about it, because that's what helps you improve. If you mess up something, or find a different way of doing things afterwards, learn from that. Don't just be a downer on yourself, you gotta be able to learn from your mistakes. You got to fail, in order to be able to get better. You got to jump into things expecting to fail, but then figure out, "If I fail, how can I get out of that?" That's one of the key things that making tokusatsu is all about, and that's one of the things that I did. Japanator: So what can you tell us about Garage Hero's future? Bueno: Garage Hero's still an infant, and we only have 1,470 something subscribers. We need to shoot that up to at least 5,000 to get the views in, and more support from YouTube. In order to do that, we need to make more content that's gonna get people to come back, and want to subscribe.  We got a lot of content planned for this year, and we hope to update our channel a bit more frequently with this next G-Rated series coming up, Hayate, and that's gonna be a local hero for Asakusa. It's probably going to be like six episodes, and I think each episode'll be to be two to ten minutes long, or somewhere around that range-- it depends on how much action we have in each episode. I'm currently producing a tokusatsu tutorial series, and it's going to give people the basic fundamentals that they need to learn how to create, shoot, and produce tokusatsu-- all within the span of five minutes each. The least I'll have is five minutes to certain each step, we'll probably have longer episodes, depending on certain topics. It'll cover everything from creating the suit, certain camera angles that you should use for shooting tokusatsu, the kind of camera lenses you should use, how to pitch your idea, choreographing a fight scene, and all that stuff. Then we plan to shoot a Web series of action shorts that are done in the style of a fighting game, so I definitely need more suggestions on what to shoot for those. From left to right: Akiba Idol Mao Makabe, Bueno, and AV Idol Fuzuki If somebody likes certain videos, subscribes to our channel, and shares our content, that means that the more Garage Hero goes viral, the more content we're able to make, because YouTube pushes our stuff out there as recommended features. Sharing our videos, liking our videos, and pushing our channel out there is key to helping us make more original tokusatsu. Support from the fandom is very important to us, and we're also open to stuff that the fans want to see. When I say, "be sure to comment, share, and like our videos," I'm not saying it each time for the sake of saying it, because that's what helps us make more content. When people say, "We want to see more Gun Caliber, I will respond to that. If people want to say, "We want to see more of what Hayate can do," of course, I'm going to read that. I read the comments, and take the time. About the YouTube thing, anybody that can interact with our channel more, and can share our channel and content will help make it viral. That helps us, because it'll let us make more original tokusatsu for you guys to enjoy. Bueno with Kenneth Duria (Kamen Rider 555's Mr. J/Crocodile Orphnoch) Japanator: Once you hit 5,000 subscribers, do you plan to utilize any funding sites like Indiegogo? Bueno: Yeah, we hope to get enough people to fund us through Indiegogo to help fund the release of Gun Caliber on DVD, plus help future projects as well. I have a couple projects that I want to pitch out there, and hopefully, people'll catch wind of them and support our work. Japanator: When you release Gun Caliber on DVD, will it be available worldwide? Bueno: Definitely, I want to show this to the whole world. Garage Hero wants to be able to pride itself as the premier independent tokusatsu resource in Tokyo run by foreigners. Anybody who comes here can come to us for any questions they might have about making tokusatsu or anything like that, and we could fill them in. We want to be able to make that claim. Japanator: Do you have any plans to release Gun Caliber-related merchandise (such as a figure or his guns)? Bueno: Probably nothing on that level, but at least something like t-shirts, travel mugs, and basically stuff that you find on Redbubble. I'm designing some stuff for Redbubble right now, so hopefully some people'll buy that merchandise. Do you remember Vector, the company in Gun Caliber? Japanator: Yes. Bueno: Basically, it's going to be like Vector merchandise, because they're kinda like Smart Brain, Yggdrasill, and Zect. I'm gonna have a lot of merchandise that'll be like character merch, roleplay kind of merch that you could buy, and kind of roleplay in the world of Gun Caliber without having the toys; although I know a lot of people who want the toys. Japanator: What about Hayate: Asakusa's Ninja Hero? Bueno: We'll need to establish a bit of a fandom first on that. Since that's for kids, we'll most likely have to make more merchandise that's for kids. If I could get funded by Bandai, then by all means, I'll have them make some SofuBi. You know SofuBi? Japanator: What's SofuBi? Bueno: SofuBi is like those plastic figurines. Look up SofuBi on YouTube, and you'll see the figurines that people make. Bandai makes SofuBi figures, short term for soft vinyl figures, and those are famous among the kaiju figures, the collectibles Ultraman figures, and stuff like that. For example, the Ultraman Ginga Spark Dolls are all SofuBi. If somebody was willing to make a Gun Caliber SofuBi figure, I would totally be all for that. It's mostly going to be stuff like stickers for now, like a Hayate stickers, iPhone cases, and pillows. Again, this stuff you could buy off of Redbubble, so that's probably going to be the stuff that Hayate'll come of it. Japanator: Can you give us an estimate date on when Hayate's first episode'll be released? Bueno: It'll probably be released somewhere around either the end of March, the beginning of April, or maybe mid April. Again, that's just an estimate, but hopefully we can get it to you at that time, so be sure to like, subscribe, share our channel, and stay tune for Hayate. People can see a teaser on our channel right now. Bueno at The ABCs of Tetsudon screening party Japanator: Do you have any final words that you'd like to say to the readers? Bueno: Making tokusatsu can be very intimidating, because it requires time, money, effort, and resources, but you don't know that until you try it. The best way to do it is to do your research, and get into it. I feel that a lot of people are always intimidated by it. They'll be like, "Wow, tokusatsu looks expensive; I don't know if I could do that." Don't get me wrong, I've seen a lot of indie tokusatsu productions that have that problem where it's shot well, but it looks like crap. The suit will look good, but the show will suck, or the show will look good, but the suit will suck. It's either one of those two. You gotta be able to balance it out by having a good suit with good action, a good story to keep it interesting, and you got to know who your audience is-- that's very important. We have a lot of content coming out this year, and we're gonna have a tokusatsu tutorial series later on in the year. We're shooting Hayate, a local hero for Asakusa. We're going to be having a fighting game style kind of Web series, so be sure to rate, link, subscribe, and share all of our videos and channel with all of your friends. Our goal is to get our subs up to 5,000 this year, so we hope to achieve that, and hopefully, everyone can help us with that.
Bueno Part 3 photo
Bueno reveals the tokusatsu industry's dark secrets
After a long and perilous journey, we've reached the end of our long interview with Bueno. To close things off, the man shares with us his plans for the future, along with his own thoughts on the tokusatsu industry and a cert...


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