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food

Food photo
Food

Japan's shrimp ice cream sounds like an intriguing summer treat


In which seafood and deserts unite
Aug 17
// Salvador G Rodiles
To this day, seafood is one of the meat groups that hasn't disappointed me. As the people of Niigata Prefecture's Uonuma invent the Nanban Shrimp soft serve to attract more tourists, I'm willing to see if I can maintain ...
Japan Crate photo
Japan Crate

Tony Hawk and Japan Crate team up to kickflip Japanese snacks to your door


They will mail it to you, no kickflips
Aug 03
// Red Veron
Surprising collaborations seem to be nothing new these days but the surprising part never ceases to do so when it does happen. This time it's the legendary pro skater Tony Hawk teaming up with subscription snack service Japan...

Japanator Unboxing: Tokyo Treat - June 2017

Jul 29 // Red Veron
There are three tiers for TokyoTreat: Small, Regular, and Premium. Check out the images below to get an idea of what each package might look like:   Small: 8 Full-Sized Snacks which includes Dagashi Bag (4 snacks + 1 Umaibo)   Regular: 13 Full-Sized Snacks which includes Dagashi Bag (4 random snacks + 1 Umaibo) and 1 Wagashi.   Premium: 18 Full-Sized Snacks includies Dagashi Bag (4 random snacks + 1 Umaibo), 1 DIY Candy Kit, 1 Drink, 1 Item, and 1 Wagashi   Use the code "JAPANATOR" to get $3 off your first order of the Premium box! Free shipping included! Available in most countries across the globe!
TokyoTreat photo
Rainy Day Munching
[TokyoTreat provided a Premium box and the writer has an affiliate partnership with TokyoTreat] TokyoTreat once again provides us with some snackage and sweets to satisfy our cravings for some Japanese treats. This...

Japanator Unboxing: TokyoTreat - February 2017

Jun 29 // Red Veron
There are three tiers for TokyoTreat: Small, Regular, and Premium. Check out the images below to get an idea of what each package might look like: Small - About 5-7 full sized Japanese candy and snacks   Regular  - About 10-12 full sized Japanese candy and snacks with DIY candy   Premium - About 16-18 full sized Japanese candy and snacks with DIY candy, special item, and drink. Use the code "JAPANATOR" to get $3 off your first order of the Premium box! Free shipping included! 
TokyoTreat photo
Sweet Strawberry, Savory Seafood
[TokyoTreat provided a Premium box and the reviewer has an affiliate partnership with TokyoTreat] When we were away for a bit, the awesome folks over at TokyoTreat once again sent me one of their yummy box of of sn...


Baskin Robbins photo
Baskin Robbins

Japan's Baskin-Robbins sandwiches aren't what you think


I didn't see this coming
Jun 29
// Salvador G Rodiles
When the ice cream shop Baskin-Robbins and sandwiches come to mind, one will imagine that it has to do with actual ice cream. Lo and behold, that isn't the case with this latest dessert.  Unlike your average ice cre...
Gundam photo
Gundam

Take a break from combat with Curry House CoCo Ichibanya's Gundam campaign


Should be it called the one-year gorge?
Jun 28
// Salvador G Rodiles
Mobile Suit Gundam's Amuro may have gone through some rough times while fighting the Principality of Zeon with his trusty giant robot, but that doesn't mean that he can't enjoy a relaxing meal. Luckily, the restaurant franchi...
Expensive Melons photo
Expensive Melons

Find out what an $140 Japanese melon is all about in this expensive video


RIP Avocado Toast
Jun 27
// Red Veron
You've probably seen those weird fruit from Japan like those square/cube shaped watermelons but what you didn't kow is that those things are expensive costing over $100 and are sold in high-end department stores. Today we're ...
food photo
food

These special takoyaki will make you want to eat the planet


Earth has never tasted this good
Mar 28
// Salvador G Rodiles
If you ever wanted to know what it was like to eat the Earth, Twitter User @kyooochang decided to make her batch of takoyaki resemble the blue planet. Sure, the taste is the same, but the craft behind its structure makes the ...

Weekend Japanatainment - Japanese Food Edition

Mar 26 // Red Veron
[embed]35658:6186:0[/embed] "These 5 Japanese Food Stories Will Satisfy Every Appetite" A collection of stories about Japanese food that serve up some interesting and appetizing morsels of information.   [embed]35658:6187:0[/embed] "Inside Japan’s Only All-Female Sushi House" Apparently, it is unusual to have female sushi chefs. Find out why in the video above!   [embed]35658:6189:0[/embed] "Japanese Vending Machine Restaurant and Food Unboxing" Only in Japan features a self service restaurant that features vending machines where you can sit down and eat food from said machines.   [embed]35658:6190:0[/embed] "How to Make GOTCHA! PORK ROAST from Food Wars, Shougeki No Sama! Feast of Fiction" Feast of Fiction, a YouTube channel all about recreating food featured in fictional works, tries to make a dish from the anime Food Wars: Shokugeki no Soma. This video has them recreating "Gotcha! Pork Roast", which is an imitation pork roast as implied by the name of the dish. Notice that there are no clips of the anime are featured because of the excessive fan service nature of the show.   [embed]35658:6188:0[/embed] "KFC Christmas Japan: A Delicious Alternate Reality" Abroad in Japan tells us about the favorite story about Japan that comes up right around Christmas: The Japanese love affair between Christmas and Kentucky Fried Chicken.   Is there a Japanese food or a video of Japanese food you like? SHARE IN THE COMMENTS BELOW! I wanna know!
Weekend Japanatainment photo
Binge on these J-Food videos
Food and culture are very intertwined, and Japan is one of those countries that likes to take it very seriously (Yes, more than you) which is probably why a lot of their food is known across the world (instant ramen counts). ...

tempura photo
tempura

Clam chowder and tempura combine into an interesting dish


Sign me the hell up
Mar 18
// Salvador G Rodiles
I may not get to have tempura too often, but I've enjoyed the meals that use this tasty batter as one of its ingredients, such as the crunchyroll, shrimp, chicken and cheesecake. As Tenya, a tempura restaurant franchise ...

Japanator Unboxing: TokyoTreat - January 2017

Feb 26 // Red Veron
There are three tiers for TokyoTreat: Small, Regular, and Premium. Check out the images below to get an idea of what each package might look like: More details at the TokyoTreat site (Don't forget to use the code "Japanator")! Small - About 5-7 full sized Japanese candy and snacks   Regular  - About 10-12 full sized Japanese candy and snacks with DIY candy   Premium - About 16-18 full sized Japanese candy and snacks with DIY candy, special item, and drink. Use the code "JAPANATOR" to get $3 off your first order of the Premium box! Free shipping included! 
TokyoTreat photo
Happy New Treats!
[TokyoTreat provided the box and the reviewer has an affiliate partnership with TokyoTreat] The nice folks over at TokyoTreat sent me a box from their New Year 2017 to check out and it is a greatly delicious way to ring the ...

Sankt Gallen Sakura photo
Sankt Gallen Sakura

Kick off the cherry blossom season with Sankt Gallen's sakura beer


Petal Dance Type Booze
Feb 23
// Salvador G Rodiles
There comes a time when you just want to bring out the booze to commemorate a joyous occasion. Of course, it's important to do this responsibly. With the cherry blossom season hitting Japan, Sankt Gallen is making sure that e...
Love Kome photo
Love Kome

Anime about a rice-themed Idol group is a thing that is happening


Like Love Live but with rice
Feb 21
// Red Veron
"In a world where people are losing interest in eating rice, five students will come together to save their school, Inaho Academy, from shutting down by getting people to eat rice again." Sounds wacky, huh? Well, that's a real anime that is coming out in April for the spring anime season.
Norigami Tacos photo
Norigami Tacos

Norigami Taco's sushi tacos sound like an intriguing combination


The East and Southwest fuse together
Feb 19
// Salvador G Rodiles
I might've said this before, but I'm a huge fan of cuisines that combines things that many people would classify as a terrible mix. One of these special combos is Norigami Taco's tacos that feature shells made out of fried te...
Rice ball holder photo
Rice ball holder

Keep your rice balls safe with Arataya's onigiri holder


No more crushed rice balls
Feb 04
// Salvador G Rodiles
If you were looking for a compact way to bring your rice balls with you, Japanese Leather Items Creator Arataya came up with an onigiri holder that'll keep your rice ball's shape intact. That way, you can enjoy this...
Kit Kats photo
Kit Kats

Sushi Kit Kats are now things that are real


April Fools joke GONE REAL
Feb 04
// Red Veron
In April 1st of Last year, Kit Kat Japan joined in on the April fools festivities and "promoted" Kit Kat Sushi as a joke for fun and to tease us with another weird yet intriguing Kit Kat flavor that the west will never see i...

Japanator Unboxing: TokyoTreat - December 2016

Jan 30 // Red Veron
There are three tiers for TokyoTreat: Small, Regular, and Premium. Check out the images below to get an idea of what each package might look like: More details at the TokyoTreat site (Don't forget to use the code "Japanator")! Small - About 5-7 full sized Japanese candy and snacks (note: There were two of those red things on the right but I are one LOL) Regular  - About 10-12 full sized Japanese candy and snacks with DIY candy Premium - About 16-18 full sized Japanese candy and snacks with DIY candy, special item, and drink. Use the code "JAPANATOR" to get $3 off your first order of the Premium box! Free shipping included! 
Tokyo Treat photo
Sweet and Savory Christmas
[TokyoTreat provided the box and the reviewer has an affiliate partnership with TokyoTreat] One of my favorite activities is where I venture to the local asian supermarkets to pick up some snacks and candy to satiate my crav...

food photo
food

These kimono design-themed chocolates are too beautiful to eat


Why do these sweets have to look pretty?
Jan 24
// Salvador G Rodiles
I may be a fan of delicacies that are crafted to look like works of art, but there's something sad about seeing one's favorite food being turned into a masterpiece. While it looks amazing, one might have second thoughts since...

Gems of Japan: Handmade Onigiri or Onigiri From a Convenience Store?

Jan 23 // Lindo Korchi
After some time, I saw an onigiri in Kyoto. But this was no ordinary onigiri from the convenient store. Instead, it was a handmade onigiri that was prepared on the same day. Time itself had paused and there was only one thing to do: purchase the handmade onigiri, as well as the convenient store onigiri, and have them battle it out to determine which is the supreme onigiri. The battle would be done by a taste test. [embed]35504:6030:0[/embed] Handmade onigiri: It was huge. It seemed like 1 1/2 convenient store onigiri's put together. I was quite glad about that, until I took my first bite -- it was only rice. The ratio between rice and salmon was disproportional. Now, the salmon was great and tasted super fresh, but the amount was so miniscule. The seaweed was moist, which I didn't enjoy. A moist seaweed is chewy and tough to eat. The reason it's moist is because the onigiri is warm rather than cold or cooled down. It's a battle and I don't like to battle with my food. (Konbu onigiri) Convenient store onigiri: It was small and had a cool temperature. Opening it felt like a work of art, as you need to pull the wrapped down, then up, which tears the plastic in half. Then you pull right and left to free the onigiri of plastic. After, the corners of the seaweed sheet blossom a bit, in which you need to lay it across the onigiri in order for it to stick. Finally, the rice ball nearly becomes covered with seaweed. The first bite is full of crunch (since the seaweed isn't moist) and cooled down rice, along with a taste of salmon. Now the ratio between rice and salmon is also disproportional, in my opinion, but not nearly as much as the home-made onigiri. It's as if the homemade onigiri contained the same amount of salmon, but had an increase of rice. Japan Full Course Menu: Before tasting them both, I secretly rooted for the homemade onigiri, as I love homemade food. I also cook, thus I appreciate it as well. But with such a noticeably unbalanced rice-salmon ratio along with moist seaweed, I couldn't add it to the menu. The convenient store onigiri has made it instead. It taste delicious, fresh, crunchy, and cool. It's awesome. But I do hope to find a home-made onigiri that is supreme. (Yes, it's true: I purchased this manga simply because of the onigiri.) I asked a Japanese friend and tourist about their opinion. The Japanese person said they prefer the homemade onigiri, but it's a little more expensive and not as convenient to get as the one in the store. The tourist said he likes the home-made onigiri for its moist seaweed and warm rice, rather than the cool and crunchy one at convenient stores. That, I found interesting. What about you?
Gems of Japan photo
Which will be in your Full Course Menu?
My first encounter with an onigiri was at a convenient store located in Tokyo, Japan (huh, why does that sound so drastic? It's as if a showdown is about to occur). I looked directly at the well packaged rice ball, and saw...

Weekend Japanatainment: Cooking with Dog Edition

Nov 13 // Red Veron
[embed]35384:5942:0[/embed] Steak with Garlic Sauce Here is the latest and possibly final video with Francis. An easy steak dish with a garlic sauce made with some really good looking garlic. Just look at the garlic that Chef got, they're so pretty.   [embed]35384:5946:0[/embed] Hamburg Steak If you've never heard of Salisbury steak, it's basically a beef patty not unlike a burger patty with gravy and mushroom bits. It's an easy recipe that beginners might find not hard to make since there aren't much ingredients.   [embed]35384:5947:0[/embed] Omurice - Omelette Rice This is a recipe for "omurice", which is a omelette and rice put together with some chicken and tomato sauce. A simple and staple dish that we see in many anime and manga because mangaka are simple people with simple tastes. Also, Omurice is super delicious too.   [embed]35384:5948:0[/embed] Gyudon - Beef Bowl Beef bowl is an easy dish that is basically thin strips of beef that melt in your mouth cooked in a sweet and salty sauce with onions topped on rice. It's so good and simple.   [embed]35384:5949:0[/embed] Sukiyaki - Japanese Hot Pot The first ever video from Cooking with Dog and it shows how the show has come a long way since 9 years ago. Sukiyaki is a Japanese dish where meats and veg are cooked in a large and wide pot, similar to that of "hot pots",often at a dinner table for people to enjoy immediately after the food inside finishes cooking. Best eaten during wintertime for providing that warm deliciousness.
Weekend Japanatainment photo
Thank you, Francis
YouTube has countless channels on cooking all kinds of food and we love Japanese food here at Japanator for obvious reasons. There is one channel about cooking Japanese food that is very recognizable to many fans of Japanese ...

Food photo
Food

This Japanese cat-shaped water cake sounds like a purrfect dessert


It's refreshingly ameowzing
Nov 12
// Salvador G Rodiles
I've always been a sucker for foods that are shaped like other things since their creators took the time to create an edible artistic piece. One of these impressive treats is Mithiruka's water cake that's shaped like a c...
Sugar Cookie Cuteness photo
Sugar Cookie Cuteness

Tiny Japanese meal cookies are too cute to eat


Bite-size Beauty
Nov 10
// Josh Tolentino
Japanese food can be known for its presentation, and in some cases its carefully considered portion sizing, but this might be going a step too far...if we're talking about actual food. Japanese artist Masako (known as "chi___...

Japanator Unboxing: Loot Anime - Delicious

Nov 03 // Red Veron
Loot Anime is a monthly mystery subscription box featuring items related to your favorite anime and manga. There will be 4-6 items with each box, about $60+ in retail value, licensed, and most are exclusive to Loot Anime. If you are interested in signing up for next month's themed box for next month, use the code "JAPANATOR" for $3 off first your order at Loot Anime!  
Loot Anime photo
Sweet Tooth for some Sweet Anime Loot
My monthly craving for some anime goodies just got satisfied with the latest Loot Anime box! The lovely folks over at Loot Anime HQ provided us with this month's Loot Anime, and the theme is "Delicious". This month's Loot An...

Review: Sushi: Jiro Gastronomy

Oct 17 // Josh Tolentino
[Photo by Hiroshi Suga] Sushi: Jiro Gastronomy (Paperback) Written By: Jiro Ono, Yoshikazu Ono, Masuhiro YamamotoPublished by: VIZ MediaReleased: October 11, 2016MSRP: $14.99ISBN: 978-1421589084 One thing should be made clear right away, for any prospective buyers of the book: Sushi: Jiro Gastronomy is NOT a recipe book. It's not even a book about sushi, at least not "sushi" in the general sense as a field of Japanese cuisine.   Instead, Sushi: Jiro Gastronomy a book about the sushi served at Sukiyabashi Jiro. Specifically. That makes a significant difference. In some ways, one could see the whole book as something of an extremely elaborate menu or catalog for the restaurant itself. The contents of the book consist of pictures of the various types of sushi served on each , with the opposite page containing information about the dish from Jiro himself. The short paragraphs - blurbs, really - are written in a more anecdotal style, conveying insights ranging from why a given piece is served before or after other types of sushi to things like cooking methods or marketing times. In essence, each entry is a window into a Sukibayashi Jiro staffer's experience of creating and serving that type of sushi. Other, more sobering impressions can be gleaned from the otherwise brief notes, such as the occasional mention of increasing scarcity of fish available for some pieces. These admissions inadvertently highlight ongoing crises with overfishing, oceanic extinctions, and sustainable fishing practices. It might not be long before some of the celebrated pieces detailed in Sushi: Jiro Gastronomy disappear from the menu. The specificity of it all makes the book feel like a journal, a series of notes rather than a carefully organized, comprehensive guide. If Sukibayashi Jiro had a gift shop so that visitors to it could pick up a memento of their reservation, this book would be on the shelf. From the cynic's view, VIZ Media is publishing and selling a promotional brochure for a restaurant that many people will never visit.  That view might hold, if not for the quality of the book itself. [Photo by Hiroshi Suga] Putting aside concerns about the nature of its contents, Sushi: Jiro Gastronomy is an utterly gorgeous physical object. Despite the fact that it's a pocket-sized paperback, the book is constructed like a decorative coffee table centerpiece. At the risk of sounding hyperbolic, reading the book feels like a genuine aesthetic act, something beyond the information contained in the text and pictures alone. The endpages are carefully textured and the whole thing gives off an aura of classiness largely absent from genuine travel guides or food books. Those readers who want to make the case for keeping and buying physical books in an age dominated by screen-based readers can file this one into evidence for their side. The content also extends past just the sushi. The main section is followed by a subsection detailing best practices for eating sushi, as well as a how-to guide for making reservations at Sukibayashi Jiro itself. In all honesty, the information detailed within isn't much more than one would get on the occasional website article. That said, having it come directly from the horse's mouth gives it an air of authority and authenticity. [Photo by Kenta Izumi] In the end, we have the answers to the dilemmas I posed earlier in the review. The purpose Sushi: Jiro Gastronomy is to be an elaborate, if heartfelt and earnest, bit of self-promotion for an expensive  very earnest, heartfelt bit of self-promotion. As for its intended audience, the gift-store patron crowd are the best fit. Beyond them, perhaps a friend who's a mega-fan of Jiro Dreams of Sushi and is planning a visit sometime soon. Genuine sushi afficionados or those less enamored of a famous little restaurant may want to hold off.
Sushi: Jiro Gastronomy photo
Slice of Life
It wouldn't be too much of a stretch at this point to declare that Jiro Ono - head chef at Tokyo's Sukiyabashi Jiro restaurant - is one of the most visible Japanese culinary professionals in the world. Thanks to his and his r...

KFC photo
KFC

Ladybeard and KFC team up for wacky sauce music video


Chicken Sauce Showdown
Oct 06
// Red Veron
Wacky food commercials are considered to be a tradition in Japan, and we never cease to be surprised of what them crazy people in the far east will think of next. Well, KFC Japan just thought of something that will make you a...
Weekend Japanatainment photo
Weekend Japanatainment

Weekend Japanatainment - US Fast Food in Japan Edition


Supersized Selection!
Aug 06
// Red Veron
Here's another helping of Weekend Japanatainment! This time it's about US fast food in Japan and how something so familiar can be so different. If you've never been outside the US, American fast food places have spread across...

Japanator Eats: What's Japan's best rice?

Aug 02 // Lindo Korchi
Hakumai (white rice) is the staple of Japanese cooking and most popular. While genmai (brown rice) is healthier and more nutritious than white rice, it isn't considered as delicious as hakumai. Japanese rice is also sticky when cooked, though not mushy. However, mochigome (glutinous rice) tends to be stickier than regular Japanese rice and is mostly used to form rice cakes. Beyond the traditional format of how we view and consume rice, there's a unique form that the Japanese have taken upon, and that's mochi (rice cakes) – rice on a whole new level. It's made by pounding the mochigome into a paste and molding it into whatever shape desired. Typically, it tastes extremely bland and chewy; it's a traditional food widely consumed and served in soups during the week of New Years in Japan. Thankfully, mochi is also available year round in a variety of ways, including sweets. If you've ever had mitarashi dango, a popular Japanese sweet sold in many convenient stores, grocery shops, and popular hot spots, then you may have eaten rice without even knowing it. With the continuing rise of mass production, many Japanese continue to opt for fresh ingredients. If the rice was harvested, processed, and packaged beyond that same year, then it cannot be sold and labeled as shinmai (new harvest rice). But what's the difference between shinmai and komai (old rice)? The grains of shinmai contains more moisture than komai, resulting in an immediate difference in taste. It's like comparing moist chicken to dry chicken; though both well, it's quite a noticeable difference. While a larger percentage of the Japanese enjoy shinmai, many do prefer komai as it's dry and not as sticky. When it comes to fresh rice, moist rice is the freshest form. The purest way to try shinmai, or any form of rice, is to have a plain bowl of it. However, I typically enjoy adding something to it, may it be nori (seaweed), furikake (dry Japanese seasoning), or salmon. Because of its nature, shinmai is more expensive than other forms of rice that you can purchase in a shop. This would also apply to various forms of dishes that are made using shinmai, such as onigiri (rice balls). You'll notice that homemade, shinmai onigiri are more expensive than the “same” onigiri found in the convenient store. The best way to try shinmai and komai for yourself is to point to a rice product (either a pack of rice, onigiri, pre-made rice, mochi, etc.) and ask “Kore wa, shinmai desu ka?”, which translates to “Is this new harvest rice?” Or, have a Japanese friend who can recommend you places that serve either shinmai or komai. As you can see, there are a variety of styles of rice, including mochi, and they're all pretty good. Currently, one of my personal favorites is onigiri made of komai. It's not too sticky, it's pretty firm, and the nori isn't moist. A common dish is tamago kake gohan (a bowl of rice mixed with a raw egg). It gives the rice a creamy texture and is quite a treat. What type of rice do you prefer, along with your personal favorite rich dishes? [Photos provided by Myself]
Japanator Eats photo
Gohan no Showdown
Interested in the tasting the best rice of Japan? Well, you may be disappointed. Unfortunately, the word “best” is an undefined word that people continue to try to define. It can't be defined because it relies ...

Weekend Japanatainment photo
Weekend Japanatainment

Weekend Japanatainment - Japanese Curry Edition


Far East Curry
Jul 30
// Red Veron
If you've never had Japanese Curry, I honestly feel bad for you. Japanese Curry is a culinary curiosity, it isn't as exotic as its Indian or Thai cousins and comes in different varieties from sweet, hot & spicy, fruity, o...
Japanese Ice Cream photo
Japanese Ice Cream

Cool off from the summer heat with some Japanese Ice Cream


Beat the Humid Heat
Jul 28
// Red Veron
If you've ever lived anywhere that has some crazy humidity, then you know how summer can just completely ridiculous where it feels like being in a sauna every single time you're outdoors. Japan just happens to be one of those...

Gems of Japan: Tasting Yakisoba & Okonomiyaki in Asakusa

May 14 // Lindo Korchi
When checking online, it didn't take long for me to discover that the most popular Okonomiyaki shop was Sometaro, located in Asakusa, Tokyo. I decided to begin my journey there.When I arrived at the shop, there was a queue that lasted for 40 minutes. After, I went inside. It was small, cozy, and warm. After viewing the menu, I gravitated to the noodle dishes and saw "yakisoba", or fried buckwheat, and decided to give it a try. I had yakisoba from the convenient store and didn't like it; a friend told me that I had to have one from a restaurant to really enjoy it. Which persuaded me to order. [embed]35014:5607:0[/embed] I believe I ordered the gomoku yakisoba. I was amazed to see that one of the staff members brought out all the ingredients and cooked my meal right before me. As for the taste? Although I like Japan, I'm not going to kid myself into liking something because it derives from the country. At the end, it was so-so. On top of that, it wasn't filling at all and I was still left hungry. However, the presentation was good. A couple of days later, I returned. This time, to order the dish that Sometaro is most famous for -- okonomiyaki. [embed]35014:5608:0[/embed] I believe I chose the gomokuten okonomiyaki. As with the yakisoba, all the ingredients were brought and cooked right before me. As for the taste? It was pretty good. I would've needed two or 1 1/2 to be full, though. The presentation was also extremely well, as it had more ingredients. Overall, I'd recommend okonomiyaki as it's really tasty. However, the most popular okonomiyaki is associated with Kansai, or to be more specific, Osaka. So if I choose to eat okonomiyaki in Osaka, I'll be interested to see if there's much of a difference, overall.When you try either one of these dishes, regardless if it's at the same shop or not, let me know your thoughts on it and which dish you prefer.
Gems of Japan photo
There Can Only Be One Winner
During my first trip to Japan, I heard a lot of people talk about Okonomiyaki. I didn't know what it was, except that some people labeled it the Japanese equivalent to pizza. I don't agree. It's more of a pancake than anything else. Nonetheless, I was interested in this pancake-pizza.


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