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Big changeup coming to the JLPT tests

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While persuing FG earlier today, they brought to light that the JLPT tests are undergoing some major revisions that will be effective starting in 2009/2010. Normally the JLPT test is arranged from Level 1-4, with 1 being the most difficult. The test is a judge of your knowledge of grammar, kanji, and listening skills, as you fill out a multiple-choice answer sheet to complete the test.

Well, now that's going to be changing. The usual Level 1-4 will be replaced by N1-N5, in an attempt to bridge the gap between the Level 2 and Level 3 test. Here's what the new system will look like:

N1: Approximately the same passing level as the existing Level 1 test, but designed to enable slightly more advanced abilities to be measured as well.
N2: Approximately the same passing level as the existing Level 2 test.
N3: Positioned at a level bridging existing Level 2 and Level 3 tests.
N4: Approximately the same passing level as the existing Level 3 test.
N5: Approximately the same passing level as the existing Level 4 test.

With this change, the JLPT will no longer publish their test questions in order to maintain a higher level of quality, and will only offer up sample questions and some profiles so that you can get an idea of which level test you should take. There's some talk of an oral and composition section in order to better test peoples' Japanese skills, but that isn't being implemented yet.

While this is all scary and new, on the bright side, they'll be offering the Level 1 and 2 test in July starting in 2009, and then offer all four Levels in December. So, head after the jump for the breakdown of what is expected of each of these new Levels for the JLPT.

N1

Reading: Reads logically constructed writing, such as newspaper editorials intended for native speakers and can follow the reasoning; reads highly abstract writing and can comprehend configurations of abstract concepts. Reads deep-content materials in a broad range of subjects and can comprehend both the progression of ideas and specific nuances.

Listening: Comprehends coherent conversations, news reports, lectures, and the like, spoken at natural speed in a broad variety of settings; can follow the progression of ideas and comprehend the content. Understands relationships among people discussed, logical structures, and other such details, and can grasp essential points.

N2

Reading: Capable of reading and understanding general information manuals and other basic written materials intended for native speakers. Can read more specialized materials ith the aid of a dictionary. Reads simply written materials on general topics and can both follow the progression of ideas and understand nuances.

Listening: Comprehends coherent conversations, news reports, and the like, spoken at nearly natural speed, in everyday life and various other settings. Can follow the flow of remarks and comprehend the content; understands relationships among people discussed and can grasp essential points.

N3
Reading: Capable of reading and understanding materials written for native speakers only if they are rewritten for nonnative speakers with simplified vocabulary and kanji. Can derive a limited amount of information from article titles in newspapers intended for native speakers. Can glean necessary information from written materials encountered in daily life with the aid of a dictionary, if sufficient time is provided.

Listening: Comprehends coherent conversations spoken at more-or-less natural speed in everyday life and in some settings seldom encountered in daily life; can generally follow a particular flow of remarks as well as relationships among people discussed.

N4
Reading: Capable of reading and understanding written materials intended for nonnative speakers on familiar topics.

Listening: Comprehends conversations encountered in daily life and can generally follow the flow of remarks, provided they are spoken slowly and can be repeated.

N5

Reading: Capable of reading and understanding phrases and sentences written for nonnative speakers using hiragana and very basic kanji.

Listening: Comprehends patterned conversations, consisting primarily of phrases and simple sentences, in daily life, typical classroom situations, and other familiar settings; can glean needed information from spoken language provided it is adapted for a nonnative speaker, spoken slowly, and can be repeated.

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Brad Rice
Brad RiceFounder   gamer profile

Brad helped found in 2006, and currently serves as an Associate He's covered all aspects of the industry, but has a particular preference for the business-end of things, more + disclosures


 


 



Filed under... #japan #learn japanese

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